Final

Saeed Arida

Final

Eli Clark

After tweaking and tinkering, we finally made something presentable. We created a working trigger and put it inside of the gun, which was make from laser cut sheets of plywood. The final product looked and worked very similarly to a crossbow, with a T-shaped piece of wood at the front of the gun running perpendicularly to the rest. In place of a rubber band, we used super-durable vulcanized rubber surgical tubing, cutting it down to appropriate sizing. Two pieces of electrical tape were placed in the middle of the piece of rubber, indicating where the plane was to be fired from. Luckily for us, the Stratos Glider came with a hook to allow it to be shot from a rubber band, so we did not have to change that design at all. The launcher was, at this point, practically finished.

We went out in the hallway to test our masterpiece and quickly noticed a couple things that needed to be changed. The electrical tape was off-center, causing the plane to be fired in inconsistent directions. A piece of the trigger was sticking out too much, and the plane's wing would collide with it every time. These problems, thankfully were easily fixed, and we had a working launcher by the final day of the Toy Studio. I'm really proud of Brian, Eli and Javier for working hard and producing a very cool toy. 

Final Product

Joseph Chafkin

After tweaking and tinkering, we finally made something presentable. We created a working trigger and put it inside of the gun, which was make from laser cut sheets of plywood. The final product looked and worked very similarly to a crossbow, with a T-shaped piece of wood at the front of the gun running perpendicularly to the rest. In place of a rubber band, we used super-durable vulcanized rubber surgical tubing, cutting it down to appropriate sizing. Two pieces of electrical tape were placed in the middle of the piece of rubber, indicating where the plane was to be fired from. Luckily for us, the Stratos Glider came with a hook to allow it to be shot from a rubber band, so we did not have to change that design at all. The launcher was, at this point, practically finished.

We went out in the hallway to test our masterpiece and quickly noticed a couple things that needed to be changed. The electrical tape was off-center, causing the plane to be fired in inconsistent directions. A piece of the trigger was sticking out too much, and the plane's wing would collide with it every time. These problems, thankfully were easily fixed, and we had a working launcher by the final day of the Toy Studio. I'm really proud of Brian, Eli and Javier for working hard and producing a very cool toy. 

Plane Design

Joseph Chafkin

For the first week of our project, the group overlooked how challenging designing a plane would actually be. We first experimented with paper airplanes, identifying where the center of gravity and center of pressure were located. Saeed demonstrated to us how small changes in an airplane's composition can completely change the plane's flight trajectory by folding different pieces of a paper airplane.

Keeping our lesson from Saeed in mind, the group began designing dozens of plane prototypes on Adobe Illustrator to be laser cut. Most designs were original, but we also tried tracing the plans of balsa wood glider toys. We cut designs out of wood, paper, foamcore, and various types of acrylic, but nothing was able to fly. With only a few days left and no functioning prototype for the plane, we felt for a moment that we had bit off more than we could chew. 

We considered changing the design from a plane to a dart, but decided that that change would be straying too far from the original design. Luckily, coach Matt was able to find the plans for a glider on www.thingiverse.com that could be 3D printed on NuVu's MakerBot. Though we were disappointed to not be able to use our own plane design, this glider was functional, easy to make, and our only realistic way to make a working, final product in the few days we had left. Accepting this, we were able to move onto the final phases of our project.

Final Project

Jess Ferreira

The Puzzle Cube group ended up with two different puzzle cubes. Both Owen and Walker designed their own puzzle cubes. There were major changes to the final projects compared to the original idea. There was no longer going to be a mechanism and there would only be one cube/box instead of eight that were able to turn. Both puzzles incorporated a marble that had a starting and ending point. Inside the box there were obstacles that would prevent the marble from getting to its exit. Both puzzles were made up of over 100 laser cut pieces and Walker's incorporated gears. These cube were made out of acrylic making it easier for people to solve. 

Lots of stuff going on

Harper Mills

Today we shifted gears a little bit (pun intended). Matt luckily finished the construction of the body last night so the only thing left to do (for the body) were the electronics. Patrick and fellow intern Graeme worked on that part while the rest of us, under the guidance of fashion coach Tess, worked on fabricating some accessories. This started with a "How To" on using the sewing machine. Students practiced sewing straight lines and turning corners on recycled fabrics. Once they were comfortable with this they started brainstorming different animals or creatures they wanted to sculpt using their newly acquired sewing skills. Tess encouraged them to think outlandishly: make a rabbit Viking princess, a countess mermaid astronaut, the more creative your character is the more creative your sewing and crafting will be. It should be noted that these stuffed toys are relatively unrelated to the original toy/robot. 

After Anna and Felipe came up with their ideas for their characters (a Tasmanian devil-tiger hybrid ninja and a magical panda tailor) they sketched them out and made notes about dimensions, texture and other specifics. Then, with the help of Tess, cut out patterns that they cut and sewed together to create their toy. After some intense stuffing and some additional accessories they both created stuffed creatures that, if I were younger, I would keep with me for a lifetime. Great job guys!

Check out the pics:) 

 

 

Redesign

Jess Ferreira

The group has done a lot of experiments that mostly revolve around the mechanism. But now it was time to rethink of a way to use three axis; one idea was to make a magnet. But in the end, mostly because of the time limit on the project, the boys decided on having the cubes rotate on one axis with different types of puzzles. 

The Beginning of the Rotation

Jess Ferreira

When the 3d pieces were fairly smooth and able to slide, we snapped the pieces in the board that Walker had made. This board was a representation of the four cubes that would be used in the final product. When the 3d pieces were sandwhiched with the two boards it was able to turn 360 degrees. The complicateions with this sandwhich type figure were when using three axis the 3d pieces would get jammed and wouln't be able to rotate properly. 

Updated 3d Printed Pieces

Jess Ferreira

Matt, our coach, designed the new 3d pices and when they were ready to be used, the group ran into some problems. There was a lot of sanding that needed to take place, we used both the dremel and sandpaper to shave down some of the plastic so when put together the two piece would slide. 

Experimenting in Smaller Parts

Jess Ferreira

There are many parts to the Puzzle Cube, a lot of what the group was doing was experimenting with smaller dimentions so eventually the cube could be scaled to size.

Owen started off by designing 3d pieces that would be located in between two cubes that would be designed later. These pieces were designed on Sketch up and printed by the MakerBot. To make duplicates of these 3d pieces, Owen and I experimented and poured a cast into the mold that was made out of silicon. These pieces failed because they didn't fit together proberly and move how we wanted them to. 

 Another part to the puzzle was making 8 small cubes that were 1.25in; we cut these out of compressed wood. There were no problems with putting these together, everything was aligned correctly. The group was slowed down because the laser cutter did not cut through the wood the first time and it did take a long time to cut. These smaller cubes were used as an experiment to see if the mechinism would work, this part of the project failed. 

A bigger cube that was designed was 4in cubed. Inside the cube were 3 intersecting planes that run along each axis with holes placed in them to allow marbles to pass through them. The holes were placed such that there are paths which the marble can take. In the end there are going to be 8 big cubs that can rotate around a center point.