Toys

  • After tweaking and tinkering, we finally made something presentable. We created a working trigger and put it inside of the gun, which was make from laser cut sheets of plywood. The final product looked and worked very similarly to a crossbow, with a T-shaped piece of wood at the front of the gun running perpendicularly to the rest. In place of a rubber band, we used super-durable vulcanized rubber surgical tubing, cutting it down to appropriate sizing. Two pieces of electrical tape were placed in the middle of the piece of rubber, indicating where the plane was to be fired from. Luckily for us, the Stratos Glider came with a hook to allow it to be shot from a rubber band, so we did not have to change that design at all. The launcher was, at this point, practically finished.

    We went out in the hallway to test our masterpiece and quickly noticed a couple things that needed to be changed. The electrical tape was off-center, causing the plane to be fired in inconsistent directions. A piece of the trigger was sticking out too much, and the plane's wing would collide with it every time. These problems, thankfully were easily fixed, and we had a working launcher by the final day of the Toy Studio. I'm really proud of Brian, Eli and Javier for working hard and producing a very cool toy. 

  • After tweaking and tinkering, we finally made something presentable. We created a working trigger and put it inside of the gun, which was make from laser cut sheets of plywood. The final product looked and worked very similarly to a crossbow, with a T-shaped piece of wood at the front of the gun running perpendicularly to the rest. In place of a rubber band, we used super-durable vulcanized rubber surgical tubing, cutting it down to appropriate sizing. Two pieces of electrical tape were placed in the middle of the piece of rubber, indicating where the plane was to be fired from. Luckily for us, the Stratos Glider came with a hook to allow it to be shot from a rubber band, so we did not have to change that design at all. The launcher was, at this point, practically finished.

    We went out in the hallway to test our masterpiece and quickly noticed a couple things that needed to be changed. The electrical tape was off-center, causing the plane to be fired in inconsistent directions. A piece of the trigger was sticking out too much, and the plane's wing would collide with it every time. These problems, thankfully were easily fixed, and we had a working launcher by the final day of the Toy Studio. I'm really proud of Brian, Eli and Javier for working hard and producing a very cool toy. 

  • For the first week of our project, the group overlooked how challenging designing a plane would actually be. We first experimented with paper airplanes, identifying where the center of gravity and center of pressure were located. Saeed demonstrated to us how small changes in an airplane's composition can completely change the plane's flight trajectory by folding different pieces of a paper airplane.

    Keeping our lesson from Saeed in mind, the group began designing dozens of plane prototypes on Adobe Illustrator to be laser cut. Most designs were original, but we also tried tracing the plans of balsa wood glider toys. We cut designs out of wood, paper, foamcore, and various types of acrylic, but nothing was able to fly. With only a few days left and no functioning prototype for the plane, we felt for a moment that we had bit off more than we could chew. 

    We considered changing the design from a plane to a dart, but decided that that change would be straying too far from the original design. Luckily, coach Matt was able to find the plans for a glider on www.thingiverse.com that could be 3D printed on NuVu's MakerBot. Though we were disappointed to not be able to use our own plane design, this glider was functional, easy to make, and our only realistic way to make a working, final product in the few days we had left. Accepting this, we were able to move onto the final phases of our project.

  • Having built an initial prototype Owen, Parker and Tommy began an in depth brainstorming session to rethink various elements of their toy. After discussing, designing and redesigning they ultimately reached a plan of what their next prototype will look like. Racing the clock for fun they completed the build of this version from scratch in a frenzied 9 minutes 57 seconds!

    The largest change made to this version from the last is a complete redesign launching plate. Instead of having it outside the barrel of the bazooka toy, it was placed inside this launching tube. This was achieved by mounting it to the end of an inner tube that nests inside the barrel. From here a handle was added to the toy, allowing this inner launching plate-tube to be drawn back easily for quick drawing in a nerf-battle .

    Two other changes included the rubber band bundles mounting and redesigning the dart. The rubber bands were mounted by plumber bands and brackets to prevent the slipping and sliding that they faced with the tape of the initial version. For the dart, the design was simplified. The spine was replaced shortened and the inner core lightened by using a section of PVC piping for longer launching. From here it was then wrapped in foam-tape followed by an outer layer of awesome, colorful tape. Additionally the tips of the rocket dart were made replaceable and magnetically removable.

  • After deciding that they were interested in making a bazooka-style foam dart launcher Owen, Parker and Tommy delved right into designing how to realize their idea. Lots of brainstorming, sketches and exploded-view drawings later and they had come up with the basic design of the initial prototype.

    This toy design made used of four bundles of large rubber bands as the means of propelling the dart. These bundles were attached on one side to the barrel of the nerf-bazooka and on the other to a launching plate. This launching plate was designed by the group in a software called Adobe Illustrator which was then used to laser-cut the piece into acrylic. This launching plate provides a surface to permanently attach rubber bands to in order to push the dart forward without having anything connected directly to the rocket. The dart itself has a wooden core that runs its length that's sandwiched inside a foam outer casing; this makes sure it remains fun not painful to shoot at eachother.

    After completing this initial prototype, the group was able to identify various aspects to improve upon. Perhaps the largest area in need or refinement seemed to be the launching plate. Drawing it back required grabbing it by your hand in an awkward manner and when released it smashed loudly into the tube. Lastly the heavy, large prototype dart proved time consuming to make given its multi layer design.

  • After two weeks of exciting, hard work Owen, Parker and Tommy completed the Foam Bazooka Launcher! This toy is designed to be played with in anything ranging from a nerf-style shootout to unstructured play. To use it, a four-finned, lightweight foam rocket is loaded into the front end of the barrel. From there two bungee cords are drawn back by a handle. One end of these elastics are attached to the outer barrel while the other to an inner tube that nests snuggly in the larger outer tube. When the handle is released the solid end of this inner piston-like tube propels the rocket forward and launches it out of the bazooka. An iron sights was added to the toy for aiming and an acrylic hand hold to comfortably grip the toy. Lastly a coat of glow-in-the-dark paint was applied to the barrel of the Foam Bazooka Launcher for night-time play.

  • The Puzzle Cube group ended up with two different puzzle cubes. Both Owen and Walker designed their own puzzle cubes. There were major changes to the final projects compared to the original idea. There was no longer going to be a mechanism and there would only be one cube/box instead of eight that were able to turn. Both puzzles incorporated a marble that had a starting and ending point. Inside the box there were obstacles that would prevent the marble from getting to its exit. Both puzzles were made up of over 100 laser cut pieces and Walker's incorporated gears. These cube were made out of acrylic making it easier for people to solve. 

  • Today we shifted gears a little bit (pun intended). Matt luckily finished the construction of the body last night so the only thing left to do (for the body) were the electronics. Patrick and fellow intern Graeme worked on that part while the rest of us, under the guidance of fashion coach Tess, worked on fabricating some accessories. This started with a "How To" on using the sewing machine. Students practiced sewing straight lines and turning corners on recycled fabrics. Once they were comfortable with this they started brainstorming different animals or creatures they wanted to sculpt using their newly acquired sewing skills. Tess encouraged them to think outlandishly: make a rabbit Viking princess, a countess mermaid astronaut, the more creative your character is the more creative your sewing and crafting will be. It should be noted that these stuffed toys are relatively unrelated to the original toy/robot. 

    After Anna and Felipe came up with their ideas for their characters (a Tasmanian devil-tiger hybrid ninja and a magical panda tailor) they sketched them out and made notes about dimensions, texture and other specifics. Then, with the help of Tess, cut out patterns that they cut and sewed together to create their toy. After some intense stuffing and some additional accessories they both created stuffed creatures that, if I were younger, I would keep with me for a lifetime. Great job guys!

    Check out the pics:) 

     

     

  • The group has done a lot of experiments that mostly revolve around the mechanism. But now it was time to rethink of a way to use three axis; one idea was to make a magnet. But in the end, mostly because of the time limit on the project, the boys decided on having the cubes rotate on one axis with different types of puzzles. 

  • next

 
  • What’s more fun that playing with toys? Inventing toys!

    In this studio, students will invent their own toys for play and entertainment. Students will work in small teams to collaboratively come up with ideas, and with the help of our coaches, bring their ideas to life. Students will be introduced to the product development process, including brainstorming, sketching, graphic design, industrial design, concept development, modeling, prototyping and aesthetics. Students will also learn about electronics and computer programming, as they will integrate digitally-interactive aspects into their inventions. Whatever the students can think up, they can build. It’s all up to their imagination!

Ajax_loader_tiny