Open Innovation Winter 2017

  • A device to help a wounded marine do butterfly pull-ups, a type of pull-up used in CrossFit, with more ease and comfort.

    Evan, a wounded marine, lost use of his right elbow in an accident while he was serving as a marine. He still enjoys doing CrossFit and other athletic activities. In order to do pull-ups, he throws an exercise band over the bar and puts it under his arm to supply resistance while he does the pull-up. This solution works but it hurts and cuts his armpit. The Pull-Up Assistant was designed to allow him to do pull-ups in comfort. This device consists of a silicone shell with foam padding to keep the exercise bands from cutting his arm. There are two parts, One that covers his underarm and one that covers the rise of his torso. There is a hard bridge between these pieces keeping his arm roughly in one position.

  • Ronan's Brief: The Pull Up Brace: A protective wearable that keeps resistance bands around the bicep and allows proper form for a one-hand pull-up without irritating the skin.

    The pull up brace is a custom design for a former marine named Evan Reichenthal. Evan lost his leg and has a fused elbow from stepping on an IED while deployed in Afghanistan. This does not keep him from  competing in athletic events such as crossfit, spartan races, and  marathons. One difficulty Evan has had in his training is that he can't use his fused right arm to do pull-ups., His solution has been to wrap a band around his bicep to be able to do the pull ups. While he is not one to complain, frequently this band moves up into his armpit which irritates his skins and compromises his form. The pull-up brace aims to bring allow proper form and comfort while still being light and simple. The basic design uses PVC, Memory foam, and elastic straps. The PVC provides a strong outside while the memory foam cushions Evan's arm.  The elastic straps allow the two PVC pieces to clamp together so they do not pull apart


    Nick's Brief: The Pull-up Brace: a protective brace that attaches to a resistance band to allow anyone to perform a one-armed pull-up. The brace is designed for a former Marine, Evan Reichenthal, who lost his right leg and forearm during his time in Afghanistan.  Evan has never lost his Marine mentality or work ethic. Evan was medically dead six times and had surgery every day for three months. When he was not in surgery, he would attach a stool to his leg and try to walk. Within a year, Evan was walking and running again. Evan continues to exercise at a Marine level today, competing in various spartan races, marathons, while working out frequently. Because he cannot bend his right arm, he does all of his workouts with his left arm. He is able to do 30 reps of pull-ups with his left arm while putting his right arm in a resistance band and use his right shoulder to create the bounce back. The problem is that the band cuts his underarm and he has to take multiple days off from pull-ups in order to heal. The pull-up brace allows Evan's arm to not have direct contact from the band to his skin. There are two parts which strap on to each other, provided with protective padding. The arm parts are connected to a foam protection to support the armpit. This maximizes Evan's ability to do pull-ups in comfort, without cutting himself and interrupting his workout. The device is made not to do the work for Evan, but to maximize his workout. With this device, those who have lost their arm in combat can still workout at the level they desire. Working out not only can help one’s physical health, but one’s mental health as well. There is a form of therapy when it comes to exercise and the hope of the Pull-up brace is to create something strong and comfortable while allowing one to surpass their potential. 

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