Final

Alexis Anderson
1 / 4

We designed a world where everything is ephemeral. Because of a monthly tsunami, everything in the wave's path gets demolished. In efforts to adapt to this extreme environment, the humans have created underground storage units for their buildings and houses to resort to during the tsunami. This way, nothing has to be rebuilt after the all-consuming wave crashes directly on top of where the city would have been.

I created a zoetrope-inspired device to  provide a visual representation of what happens during the natural disaster. It is more of a sculptural model than methodical one and it evokes emotion from its audience.

Final

Halina Anderson and Julian Knight
1 / 4

After brainstorming several ideas for futuristic worlds, we decided to create a world where aliens have terraformed the planet and forced all of humanity to live in a series of massive skyscrapers that tower hundreds of stories into the air. Our first concept model consisted of two identical cardboard cutouts, shaped like buildings. Our next design took a different approach, with a base "framework" upon which living modules would be attatched in clusters along the tower's "branches." This model was made of balsa wood and foam core modules, which were hot glued onto the frame. We created two variations: one with a block-like modular structure and another with a more organically-shaped triangles clustered around the entire building. For our third model, we radically changed our idea, and added a concept in which the "branches" of the building become magnetic and can attract nearby debris that are then modified and sculpted to serve as living modules. As a concept model, we cut holes in a cardboard tube and inserted thin metal rods which we then hot glued into place. Then, we placed magnets on the rods in the tube's interior, which would then attract any objects placed on the exterior rods, like small washers and bolts. Our fourth iteration was a prototype of our final model that consisted of three laser-cut plywood triangles, each in decreasing size, that would be run through piano wire to create a shape resembling a cellular of radio tower. Our final project was very similiar, with the addition of an acrylic box and magnetic paint.

Based on our earlier "cellular tower" framework design, coupled with magnetic attraction of building materials, we decided to build a wooden and metal model similar to our previous prototype. Since we wanted to be able to demonstrate the ability to attract debris and metals, we needed a way to contain objects like washers and iron filings that could still hold magnets and the three towers. We decided to construct an acrylic box with a plywood base. Flipping the box would cause the debris to fall upwards and be collected by the electromagnets in the top of the container. The box would then be righted and the electromagnets deactivated, where they would then be collected by the towers, which we painted with magnetic primer. Small items like iron filings and washers would be attracted to the painted "branches," while larger debris would be too heavy or miss the collection points and fall to the bottom. The towers could then be moved magnetically from inside the plywood base to move them into range of the fallen pieces. We decided to take the same design approach for the towers as our pervious model; however, because of the box's size, we had to lower the height of the towers from 10 inches to 8. After adjusting our design in Rhino, we laser cut three nesting shapes: a circle, a triangle, and a hexagon. Each shape had a number of "branches" on each side, along with holes to accommodate the trimmed piano wire that we used to connect the plywood sections. After constructing each tower, we painted the wooden sections with magnetic paint to make the tower more magnetic in general. We were skeptical about the paint, we weren't sure if it was actually going to be able to attract, but in the end it worked surprisingly well. Once all the towers were covered in paint, we decided to glue on circular magnets to the piano wire to give it even more magnetic.

Demo

Andrew Todd Marcus and 2 OthersAlexis Anderson
Phoebe Rosenthal

Process Post

Harry ZHENG and Hao SUN
1 / 20

We had this idea just about you can travel in the time in that world. We imagine about how the world works. We told about how to travel, it’s like you can take a transportation like trains to control the time.

Then we discussion about the appearance of the world. We take for there's only some rings around a canter, not like the normal planet. Then we made a model to describe how the world likes.

The direction of the ring’s gravity is always towards the center of the ring. So we draw a big picture of the rings to show what the ring looks like. The trains can run inside the rings and the buildings are around the rings.

The next the day, we started to make another model. We used the pipes to make circles and tied the circles together.

The day after we have made that model, we cut the half, and put the pipes into the holes witch we cut it using the Laser Cutter in the wood. And then we added more pipes. It looks cool.

For the final model, we made holes in the acrylic. We used the 3D printer to make two kind of the things. One is to connect the pipes, and the other one is to hold the rings. All of the things is done.

Process

Alexis Anderson
1 / 11

I designed a world where everything is ephemeral. Because of a monthly tsunami, everything in the wave's path gets demolished. In efforts to adapt to this extreme environment, the humans have created underground storage units for their buildings and houses to resort to during the tsunami. This way, nothing has to be rebuilt after the all-consuming wave crashes directly on top of where the city would have been.

I created a zoetrope-inspired device to  provide a visual representation of what happens during the natural disaster. It is more of a sculptural model than methodical one and it evokes emotion from its audience.

Requirements for Final Post

Rosa Weinberg and Andrew Todd Marcus
1 / 3

Your "Final Post" should only show the final images and diagrams of your final project. 

Images: See slideshow above explaining the images required for the final post

Text: The text should answer the following questions:

  • What is the main idea? This can be a 2-3 sentence "Elevator Speech"..
  • What is the design problem? What are you trying to solve?
  • Why is this project important?

Process

Halina Anderson and Julian Knight
1 / 13

After brainstorming ideas for several futuristic worlds, we decided to create a world where aliens terra form the planet and force the entire human population to live in a series of massive towers that can contain millions of inhabitants. Our first concept model was made of two cardboard outlines of a large building, slotted together to create a three-dimensional model. Our next model was made out of thin wood sticks and cut up pieces of foam core. We decided on this type of model because we wanted to convey the idea of things coming together and making it into a whole building. We both made one model, but they ended up looking kind of different. One model looked more scattered, with organic module shapes, while another was very organized, with cubelike geometric modules. For our third model, we radically changed our idea, and added a concept in which the "branches" of the building become magnetic and can attract nearby debris that are then modified and sculpted to serve as living modules. As a concept model, we cut holes in a cardboard tube and inserted thin metal rods which we then hot glued into place. Then, we placed magnets on the rods in the tube's interior, which would then attract any objects placed on the exterior rods, like small washers and bolts. Our fourth iteration was a prototype of our final model that consisted of three laser-cut plywood triangles, each in decreasing size, that would be run through piano wire to create a shape resembling a cellular of radio tower. Our final prototype was very similiar, with the addition of an acrylic box and magnetic paint.

Spiderbot Final Crawling

Jonathan Hu and Erin Pellegrino

Requirements for Final Post

Rosa Weinberg and 2 OthersErin Pellegrino
Andrew Todd Marcus
1 / 3

Your "Final Post" should only show the final images and diagrams of your final project. 

Images: See slideshow above explaining the images required for the final post

Text: The text should answer the following questions:

  • What is the main idea? This can be a 2-3 sentence "Elevator Speech"..
  • What is the design problem? What are you trying to solve?
  • Why is this project important?

Musical Topography

Saba Ghole
1 / 9

My project is a music box, with music based off the topography of a made up skyline. First, I thought about what this mysterious city was like, and what happened in this city. I drew some sketches of this city, creating unique buildings and bridges. After creating this city, I made some skylines with six different heights. One, being a rest in the music, and two through six being different music notes. After creating these five skylines of an unknown city, picked three to use. I then overlapped two cities at a time, noticing which parts overlap, and which parts don't. I took the information I had about each skyline, and turned it into a graph. I made seven graphs in all, each graph we turned into music. Three were three separate skylines: Red, blue, and yellow. Another three were two skylines combined: Red and yellow, blue and red, and yellow and blue. And the last was all the skylines incorporated into one graph: Red, yellow, and blue. That was the final music piece. Then I sketched some boxes, and then made a box on Rhino, with an area to put the cylinder, and a surface to place the tine. After, I laser cut my pieces, put them together, and attached the tines and cylinder with nails in it. It was finally put together. When I turn the cylinder, the metal hits the tines, creating the music of this unknown city.