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  • 4th and Final Iteration:

    For our final iteration, we had our 3D-printed sole with the louvers bolted into the holes and the felt draped on the top.

    The main idea of our "pores" shoe is to allow for both breathability and the cooling down of your foot. Although most running sneakers use moisture-wicking material (mesh), we found that many peoples' feet are still very much heat-induced while wearing them. Our goal is to naturally "cool down" your feet with louvers that manually open and close like window shutters. Also, our triangulated design soles allow for more breathability of your foot. 

  • We created a breathable shoe that changes as you walk and cools your foot down in the process. It is composed of three main parts; the heel, the sole, and the outer shoe.

    The sole is 3D printed and works like a bellow. There is a hinge in the shoe that allows the heel to expand and contract. When the heel contracts it pushes air through your shoe and cools your foot down. The sole has origami around it that expands and contracts as you walk, creating the air-tight bellow.

    The upper part of the shoe is 3D printed and is meant to camouflage the origami in the heel and add cohesiveness to the design. It uses the same pattern as the origami sole, but doesn’t expand and contract.

    The heel is made of fabric and is laser cut. It is made of layers of fabric stacked on top of each other to look like a sneaker. The layers are all sewn together. The outer shoe is what holds all the parts together and makes it look like a shoe. 

  • Going off of where the last studio left off, there were two main goals for our independent session: to make a functional "control glove," and to make a more organize, well constructed mask. 

    The glove was made well, although I wish there could've been better wire organization, and maybe some color coordination for aesthetics. The rings housed the pressure sensors, and all had wires tha converged to the wristband pretty nicely. 

    We made the mask construction 100% intentional this time, as opposed to the random scale placement of the Mark I, "Yeti" mask. For the Mark II, everything was designed in Rhino, and specifically made to fit together. Because everything had to be so exact, there were some small mistakes and things that didn't work out as anticipated, but overall it came out looking good.

  • Continuing from the Mark I mask we made in the Uno Space studio, there were two main goals in mind going into the IPP session: To make a functional, wearable, glove; and to make a well crafted, organized second version of the Mask. From this there were two main processes: The glove building, and the Mask Building. In the end, we finished with a fully functional, and wearable glove, and a fragile, yet beautiful Mask Mark II. Just because I gave Mark I the nickname "yeti," I'll name this Mark II version "Guy" mask because it reminds me of Guy Manuel of Daft Punk.

     

    Glove:

    Starting this studio, the glove had a 1st gen version of the wristband, pressure sensors, and rings that worked, but weren't perfect. 

    First, we made better rings, with holes that were not too small, and not too big either. There was minimal protrusion from the hole on this version. 

    We also made a better version of the wristband, this time with a battery slot, and a hole for the wires to feed through.

    Next, we made a pinky ring because the regular sized rings were not fitting on the pinky's first knuckle; the hole's diameter was too big. 

    From there, we decided the rings were finalized, and started to play around with conductivity to incorporate the switch in a more seamless way than just having two male connectors to touch each other. 

    Next, we organize all the wires and use electric tape to separate them in an organized way, and connect them to the arduino on the Wristband, and the Glove is complete.

     

    Mask:

    The mask design was started a little late in the two weeks. We started with Rhino, and make difference arches based on approximate measurements of my face. From there we designed a model and laid out the pieces for the laser cutter. There were a few design changes along the way, such as the addition of the ear pieces, or the shape of the tiles, but none of those were physically iterated because of material conservation. After everything was cut out, everything was assembled to make the mask. Because of how small we made the Ear Pieces, the mask itself is a little fragile, but is still strong enough to be worn. The holes for the LED's didn't line up properly, so the LED strip ended up being hot glued in a last minute effort to have the mask presentable that Thursday. The mask is near perfect, and if I ever have the opportunity to make another one, I already know which issues need fixing, and how to fix them.

  • Our inspiration was based off of two previous projects.  One of them being Humans of Cambridge and the other one being reflections.  Humans of Cambridge cinemagraphs displays a wide variety of Cambridge life.

  • In this project, I sought to tackle the largely publicized issue of oversexualization of women in media, along with the slightly less publicized issue of ageism in the media. To combine these two issues, I addressed the question "Why can't elderly women be attractive?". I took two days to shoot pictures of advertisements in Central Square that I felt portrayed young women from different cultures in an oversexualized manner. This included sexualizing certain body parts, such as legs (American), eyes (Japanese mostly, and sometimes American), and lips (Japanese and American). After selecting five advertisements that I particularly found striking in terms of their level of oversexualization, I Photoshopped a face of an old woman over the faces, and of "blemished" arms and legs for the other body parts visible. The end result is the set of five images, here juxtaposed with the five original images.

  • In this project, I sought to tackle the largely publicized issue of oversexualization of women in media, along with the slightly less publicized issue of ageism in the media. To combine these two issues, I addressed the question "Why can't elderly women be attractive?". I answered this question by Photoshopping a series of images of advertisements featuring oversexualized women to make the women seem very elderly. I used advertisements from different cultures (American and Japanese) found in different parts of Central Square. Here is the series of five Photoshopped advertisements, followed by the original five advertisements.

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