Spring 2015 IPP

  • Our inspiration was based off of two previous projects.  One of them being Humans of Cambridge and the other one being reflections.  Humans of Cambridge cinemagraphs displays a wide variety of Cambridge life.

  • In this project, I sought to tackle the largely publicized issue of oversexualization of women in media, along with the slightly less publicized issue of ageism in the media. To combine these two issues, I addressed the question "Why can't elderly women be attractive?". I took two days to shoot pictures of advertisements in Central Square that I felt portrayed young women from different cultures in an oversexualized manner. This included sexualizing certain body parts, such as legs (American), eyes (Japanese mostly, and sometimes American), and lips (Japanese and American). After selecting five advertisements that I particularly found striking in terms of their level of oversexualization, I Photoshopped a face of an old woman over the faces, and of "blemished" arms and legs for the other body parts visible. The end result is the set of five images, here juxtaposed with the five original images.

  • In this project, I sought to tackle the largely publicized issue of oversexualization of women in media, along with the slightly less publicized issue of ageism in the media. To combine these two issues, I addressed the question "Why can't elderly women be attractive?". I answered this question by Photoshopping a series of images of advertisements featuring oversexualized women to make the women seem very elderly. I used advertisements from different cultures (American and Japanese) found in different parts of Central Square. Here is the series of five Photoshopped advertisements, followed by the original five advertisements.

  • Continuing from the Mark I mask we made in the Uno Space studio, there were two main goals in mind going into the IPP session: To make a functional, wearable, glove; and to make a well crafted, organized second version of the Mask. From this there were two main processes: The glove building, and the Mask Building. In the end, we finished with a fully functional, and wearable glove, and a fragile, yet beautiful Mask Mark II. Just because I gave Mark I the nickname "yeti," I'll name this Mark II version "Guy" mask because it reminds me of Guy Manuel of Daft Punk.

     

    Glove:

    Starting this studio, the glove had a 1st gen version of the wristband, pressure sensors, and rings that worked, but weren't perfect. 

    First, we made better rings, with holes that were not too small, and not too big either. There was minimal protrusion from the hole on this version. 

    We also made a better version of the wristband, this time with a battery slot, and a hole for the wires to feed through.

    Next, we made a pinky ring because the regular sized rings were not fitting on the pinky's first knuckle; the hole's diameter was too big. 

    From there, we decided the rings were finalized, and started to play around with conductivity to incorporate the switch in a more seamless way than just having two male connectors to touch each other. 

    Next, we organize all the wires and use electric tape to separate them in an organized way, and connect them to the arduino on the Wristband, and the Glove is complete.

     

    Mask:

    The mask design was started a little late in the two weeks. We started with Rhino, and make difference arches based on approximate measurements of my face. From there we designed a model and laid out the pieces for the laser cutter. There were a few design changes along the way, such as the addition of the ear pieces, or the shape of the tiles, but none of those were physically iterated because of material conservation. After everything was cut out, everything was assembled to make the mask. Because of how small we made the Ear Pieces, the mask itself is a little fragile, but is still strong enough to be worn. The holes for the LED's didn't line up properly, so the LED strip ended up being hot glued in a last minute effort to have the mask presentable that Thursday. The mask is near perfect, and if I ever have the opportunity to make another one, I already know which issues need fixing, and how to fix them.

  • Going off of where the last studio left off, there were two main goals for our independent session: to make a functional "control glove," and to make a more organize, well constructed mask. 

    The glove was made well, although I wish there could've been better wire organization, and maybe some color coordination for aesthetics. The rings housed the pressure sensors, and all had wires tha converged to the wristband pretty nicely. 

    We made the mask construction 100% intentional this time, as opposed to the random scale placement of the Mark I, "Yeti" mask. For the Mark II, everything was designed in Rhino, and specifically made to fit together. Because everything had to be so exact, there were some small mistakes and things that didn't work out as anticipated, but overall it came out looking good.

  • We sought to solve the timeless problem of discomfort in high heel-wearers. Such discomfort often leads to intense pain and carrying a multitude of more comfortable shoes everywhere just to minimize wearing heels. Previous attempts at a changeable high heel have been either ugly or difficult to use. Our final iteration is composed mostly of three 3D-printed components that we created in Rhino, a modeling software. The heel and upper sole parts can notch securely together, as well as easily detach for a lowered position. The bottom of those parts are hinged to the base piece—which provides overall support and structure—to facilitate a more fluid downward motion. There are also two high-quality leather straps per shoe, which we fashioned ourselves with the help of Jenny Milwid, a professional leatherworker. Both straps are laced through a hidden slot in the back of the heel, and while the shorter strap wraps around the user's ankle, the other goes down the foot and through another hidden slot in the toe.

  • Our on-and-off work (the combined time was about two months) on this project has culminated in this latest iteration. At first, we were focused on the mechanism, and how to make the concept of an adaptive high heel come to life. We made a few different prototypes, but we liked the idea of the shoe constructed out of different parts, so the actual heel could fold down into the rest of the shoe, which would also create a unique, interesting design. We found a template for the outline of a high heel, and from that created a high heel in a modeling software called Rhino. The sole was split in two and hinged,  just below the toe, to make an easier (and possible) transition from low to high positions. The bottom of the heel component was hinged to the lower sole, so both pieces could move. The heel and upper sole were notched together, rather than hinged, but the notch we designed in this initial iteration was weak and not secure. The overall shape was also not stylish, uncomfortable, and led to a certain fragility that meant we didn’t feel safe walking on it.

     

    With new knowledge on high heel design, we remodeled the notch and designed our own shoe shape. Where our first iteration was too skinny, this iteration was too big. Inspired by an actual human foot, it was more comfortable but still drastically lacking in style. Although we wanted to be distinct from a typical high heel, we also wanted our product to look as good as possible. The new notch was also much too tight, and required the user to pull at an unreasonable angle and with unreasonable strength. We also added slots to the side of the upper sole and base, for lacing straps.


    For our spring independent project, we fixed the remaining problems, with a focus on making the heel user-friendly and beautiful. One of our more major accomplishments was the addition of straps, which took many iterations and adjustments in the design of the heel. We wanted the attachment method to be as discreet as possible, so we experimented with a lot of different methods for concealment. We were drawn to lacing the straps through the back of the heel, which is mostly not paid attention to. After trying horizontal slots, four slots, side slots, and slots that went through the heel entirely, we decided on simplicity: one vertical channel (which is the equivalent of two slots), and one slot in the base, which is mostly hidden in the new reveal.  Jenny Milwid, a professional leatherworker, came in to teach us about using leather and lend us her tools and high-quality leather. From there, we cut our own straps with holes and buckles, and made two for each shoe. We also redesigned the shape of the shoe to be both distinct and beautiful, and made a notch that can attach securely as well as detach easily.

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