Final

Nicholas Vaream and Connor LaBelle

The problem we decided to tackle was that little Saeed could not use the the laser cutter on his own -- he required John's help. Ideas flowed as we empathized with his condition, and we used a wheelchair to see how difficult it is to lift the cutter top and focus the laser. We created a a staff with three tools that can lift the top, focus the laser, close the top. We went throught multiple iterations and eventually finished with a fully laser cut wooden staff. Our ultimate goal is to allow disabled individuals to make more effective use of maker spaces to create what their dreams hold.

Process

Nicholas Vaream and Connor LaBelle
1 / 12

Final

Alexia Duarte and Samuel Waldman
1 / 5

The purpose of the Screw Box Reacher is to help anyone who comes to Nuvu and is handicapped. Our device will help them reach different screws at difficult heights without spilling the entire screw box. This circuited reacher grabs onto the screw box with a front clamp and then as somone pulls it out a motorized wheel places a track to stabilize the box so it wont spill.

Process

Caleb Woods and 2 OthersPeter Rabinovitz
Noah Zakarian
1 / 10

Process

William Drubner and Hudson Roddy
1 / 8

Process Post

Samuel Waldman and Alexia Duarte
1 / 11

1. Design Problem and Solution:

Problem: At Nuvu space is very limited and certain spaces are not accessible for those with disabilities. An example of this are shelves in the shop that are really high up.

Solution: The Screw Box Reacher makes it easier for someone in a wheelchair to reach up and pull screw boxes towards them.

Detailed solution: The selfie sticks makes reaching screw boxes easier, the track on the stick slides under the box and the motor moves the track back and forth to bring the box towards the person.

2. Further Elaboration:

Main Story: Our project solves the problem of screw boxes being too high in the woodshop because the reacher can grab different types of of screw boxes and bring them down safely.

Mechanics: The mechanics behind our project is the first clamp on front of the grabber. This part grabbed onto the screw box with a tight grip. Then when you push the selfie stick button a motorized wheel spinned and  places a track underneath the box when you pull it out so that the box will not fall. The motor is circuited through a selfie stick and spins a wheel that slides the track underneath the box. In order for this to work you have to pull the box and then press the button.

Development: We progressed with our project through many different iterations. We first made this out of cardboard and moved through different wood iterations and experimenting with the idea of a track to stabilize the screw box.

Challenges: Some of the challenges we faced included how to stabilize the screw box, how the track would fit, how the track would move, and how the reacher would grab onto the box. Other challenges we faced was using Rhino because this was our first studio. Also, we had a hard time creating the track and making sure the motor would work.

Iteration 1:The first iteration was an idea that we came up with to grip the screw box without it falling and spilling the tools. The feedback we received from this iteration was to make the mount more sturdy and having it also push in the tool box. We used this feedback by using a spring that the box can hook on to, after unhooking the box the front of the mount will push the box back in.

 

Iteration 2: As we made changes to our first iteration we decided to have the track move which would make bringing  the tool box to the person easier and move safer. We used a portable motor that was hooked up by two wires, red and black.The wires were connected together on one side then connected to a battery. On the side of the motor was a wheel that would eventually move the track under the tool box for stability and easy access.We also decided to use a clicker to control the track with the push of the button and it also saves energy from the battery.

Iteration 3: When we started to create our third iteration, we received feedback about all of the wires being exposed and the clicker and battery being taped to the stick. We then decided to 3D print a battery pack and a clicker ring that would slide onto the stick.The selfie stick was opened up and the wires were placed inside.

 

Process Post

Pierce Adams and Carter McDivitt
1 / 11

Final Post

Pierce Adams and Carter McDivitt
1 / 7

Studio Description

Rosa Weinberg
1 / 1

In NuVuEnabled, students will explore what it means to be in a wheelchair and be a maker. With the help of Mohammad Sayed, a former student who uses a wheelchair, students will create devices to make NuVu's fabrication equipment fully accessible. We will be making the laser and 3D printer files available, along with construction diagrams and directions, to enable users at maker spaces across the country.

Hacking Wheelchairs for Urbanity: Canopy

Yoni Segal and 2 OthersJules Gouvin-Moffat
Sam Daitzman
1 / 10

The wheelchair canopy protects anyone that needs a wheelchair from rain, snow, and other elements. It folds back to stay out of the way when not in use. It has a ratchet mechanism that allows the user to position it however far up or down they need, and its modular design allows it to be quickly attached to any standard wheelchair.

When we spoke to a person who uses a wheelchair, one of the issues we heard about was weather, and how to avoid it. Since two hands are needed for full control of a wheelchair, holding an umbrella is very inconvenient. Our project frees both hands without increasing the width profile of the wheelchair, so it can still fit in an urban environment. The project would enable any wheelchair user to get through the weather without inconveniencing them or complicating their movement.