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  • Throughout this exciting and informative studio, I learned many helpful tips and techniques to improve my photography. At the start of the studio, Biz introduced us to the basic functions of the cameras we will be using. She taught about ISO, apeture, and shutter speed. After I was debriefed and given this information, I used the skills I learned and photographed candid portraits outside NuVu. This experience was good practice because we had to approach people and ask them a series a questions pertaining to sports. These questions included: 

    What is your favorite Boston sports team?

    Do you feel a dominant sports presence within the city?

    Do you notice a difference in devotion between Boston fans and fans from other cities?

    After, I wanted to profile a college athlete, and contact teams and athlectic directors in the area for their opinions on this topic. I had to create a pitch and hook that will introduce and capture the audience.

     

    Background: Media portrays athletes as selfish and spoiled individuals, hopefully this will show people a good side of athletes with proof of specific good deeds

    Have you ever wondered what athletes are outside of the field or court? Behind the cameras and magic moments, these remarkable and figures have a lot of hidden talents and inspirational stories. Some have the impression that professional athletes get caught up in the spotlight and forget sportsmanship and basic values. For this project I want to highlight athlete’s life outside of their normal settings. Hopefully, this study will show people the different personalities and characteristics they possess.

       

    Hook: Often we associate athletes on the field and court, but have you ever wondered what these gifted players are like off their normal stage?

     

    Then, I set up interviews with Phill Hess, Mindy Bauer, and Charlotte Brackett. These interviews helped me understand why there are conflicting views and evidence to back this up. 

    Interviews:

    Phil Hess   

    -majority of players are good people

    -mean well

    -capable of doing important things and good deeds

    -make mistakes

    -THEY ARE HUMANS

    -media coverage (Verlander helps wounded veterans go to Detroit Tiger games in his private box)

    -Born with a particular skill set that can make them humble or bask in the limelight

    -”Unfortunately everything that athletes say can be used against them, people often forget that they are normal people just like us”

     

    Mindy Brauer

    -There are charities and foundations that athletes support

    -some get arrested and set a bad example for their fans

    -”My opinion on athletes is mixed, I feel that the two kinds of athletes are the ones that donate and support charities and the other are the ones that get arrested”

     

    Charlotte Brackett

    -Players are always in the spotlight even after the game they have interviews

    -Fans boo and cheer during games when players make mistakes, they are humans just like us and are prone to make mistakes

    -Being a D1 college student, we grew up learning how to manage our time

    -Become accustomed to balancing fun and work, not much free time in athlete’s busy schedule

    -Practice takes a lot of time and it’s hard to relax because of tight schedules

    -University of Richmond best 4 years of her life, majored in english and journalism

    -British accent that immediately captures your attention

    I was able to go to the Beanpot Tournament in Fenway Park, and take photos of the Harvard Crimson vs. Boston College Eagles game. This was very exciting and I was able to produce some of my best photographs. Later, I visited Harvard University, and interviewd Sean Poppen, a pitcher for the Crimson. He gave a lot of helpful insight and told me the difference between college and high school sports, managing work and athletics, and his involvent in clubs. Overall, I had a very successful and interesting experience.

  •      At first my initial "pitch" for my photography project was, "to set off into the City with no idea in particular and let the people and the surroundings of Cambridge decide my project for me. Everything and anything will be my inspiration, and slowly but surely the City of Cambridge will carve the path of my project for me." However after a day or so of shooting it was clear I probably needed a little more structure! I then had the idea to take pictures of the various aspects found throughout the city of cambridge, so off I went into cambridge and shot a wide array of pictures that I thought somewhat enraptured the moods felt all around cambridge. After looking back on my photos a couple days in it was clear that I was attracted to geometry in my photos. The majority of my photos were close ups of interesting patterns and objects.

     

         I really enjoyed walking around the streets of Cambridge in search of the perfect picture! I also was very happy that I became much more educated with photography; I now understand how to change the ISO and aperture appropriately, which was a huge help since usually I tended to have many overexposed photos!

     

         In the end I was able to write my mini article about the city of Cambridge, filled with many descriptions of the many senses I felt each day walking through the city.   

  • The studio began by practicing interviewing others and learning basic camera functions. The second day consisted of us picking topics and doing some brainstorming on projects. I chose Boston sports beccause I feel that it is a relevant topic and could have a meaningful piece. I chose to explore the relationship between Boston sports teams and their fans in the wake of tragedy like the Boston Marathon Bombings. I spent the first part of my project photographing aroiund central square. I interviewed people on the street in order to get an idea of what the general attitude in Cambridge was towards my topic. After many interviews I realized that I wanted to move towards the memorials dedicated to the attacks on Boylston Street. The first day I went to Boylston Street I was hesitant to aproach people and only knew of the small memorials at the bombing sites. After experiencing the region the first day, I wanted to return in order to improve and get some more successful photos. I found the large memorial at Copley Square and began to photograph. I kept in mind everything I have learned about taking a successful photograph and I was able to create a complete and professional collection of photos. I chose the final photos for my story and matched them up with the wirtten piece in order to show the reader and viewer my entire project's work. 

  • This studio was a great experience. I learned a lot about photography and more about how to write in a concise and clear way. It was really fun to get to go out in the middle of the day and do the interviews and take photos. I also really enjoyed meeting the people I interviewed, though not everyone I approached on the street wanted to talk to me. Even though it was disappointing it was a good lesson to learn to be able to brush it off and try again. I was glad to hear from everybody that I interviewed that Cambridge provides a lot of services for homeless people, though there can always be more. However, because of sequestration and budget cuts, there’s going to be a lot less affordable housing options for homeless people which is depressing. I want to continue to find more about the homeless situation in Cambridge, especially since it is predicted to get worse. I think that this kind of work is very important. When I asked what was the best way people can help the homeless situation, almost everyone said educate yourself about the issue. A lot of times people tend to jump to conclusions and judge others, which is a totally ineffective way to help the issue. It is important to be informed about what is actually happening which is the importance of journalism. 

     

  • At first my initial "pitch" for my photography project was, "to set off into the City with no idea in particular and let the people and the surroundings of Cambridge decide my project for me. Everything and anything will be my inspiration, and slowly but surely the City of Cambridge will carve the path of my project for me." However after a day or so of shooting it was clear I probably needed a little more structure! I then had the idea to take pictures of the various aspects found throughout the city of cambridge, so off I went into cambridge and shot a wide array of pictures that I thought somewhat enraptured the moods felt all around cambridge. After looking back on my photos a couple days in it was clear that I was attracted to geometry in my photos. The majority of my photos were close ups of interesting patterns and objects.

    I really enjoyed walking around the streets of Cambridge in search of the perfect picture! I also was very happy that I became much more educated with photography; I now understand how to change the ISO and aperture appropriately, which was a huge help since usually I tended to have many overexposed photos!

    In the end I was able to write my mini article about the city of Cambridge, filled with many descriptions of the many senses I felt each day walking through the city.   

  • Central Square in Cambridge, well known for its art scene, has a history of murals by local artists on the walls of the square. Whether it’s graffiti, constantly painted and repainted all the time, to murals by professionals to illustrate a point, it’s near impossible to walk through the streets of Cambridge without seeing a wall or other city landmark decorated.

    One of the best known murals lives on the wall of the Middle East Restaurant. According to Owen Kennet, the general manager of the Middle East, “The mural is a testament to the multi-faceted aspect of the Middle East. It pays homage to the really important figures who, from the community, made this place what it is...It’s a representation in paint of the very interesting and open community that surrounds us and the community that gives us strength and diversity. It’s just fantastic and I love everything about it.”

    The Middle East operates differently than most music venues. It is made up of various parts—the Corner, the Downstairs club, the Upstairs, and ZuZu restaurant. Each part has its own menu and performance space to house various types of entertainment.

    The Middle East dates back to 1968, when the original restaurant was opened. Purchased by Nabel Sater Habib who still owns the Middle East, with his brother Joseph, they opened what is now the Upstairs as a restaurant space in 1974. Later, he turned the dining area into a performance space and a spice store. In 1986, the space for the Upstairs club was established. In 1990, the Corner, which was then a bakery, went out of business, and Habib purchased it and turned it into the Corner restaurant. In 1992, a bowling alley below the Corner shuttered, and Habib snatched up the opportunity to turn it into a performance club, now the Downstairs, where big names headline shows.

    With its various restaurants and venues, the Middle East draws different crowds depending on the performers of the night. Ranging from punk rock, to rap, to heavy metal, to funk and beyond, there is always a wide variety of music on display. Altogether, the complex can hold up to 600 people. The venue has seen greats come through over the years, including Tony Bennett, Public Enemy, Flava Flav, Aerosmith, and Eminem. The walls are lined with memorabilia—photos of the restaurant in its original state, flyers from past shows, signed images, and electric guitars—filling the space with a sense of history.

    And the space has withstood the test of time—despite the economic downturn, the venue has consistently sold out shows. The Middle East—like the mural adorning its exterior—is a staple of the Central Square community. As Kennet says, “It’s just fantastic and I love everything about it.”

    This was an interesting studio in terms of learning more of how journalism works and what needs to be done in order to have a good story made. I learned how to take different shots such as reflection shots and taking portraits. I also learned of how to conduct interviews, interviewing Middle East was very interesting especially learning about its past performances many fancy individuals have performed there and the history of the restaurant's start was also very interesting.

    Here is a link to the picture on the NY Times blog. 

  • When asked, "What do you want to do when you grow up?" my most recent, reoccurring answer has been, a sports journalist. Ergo when the opportunity to do a photo-journalism project about my hometown came along, of course I chose to do the project about Boston sports. I realized that in Beantown, the sports are so important and so continueally succesful and storied that the teams share a more significant connection to the city than in other places. After this realization, I decided that my photo essay would document the impact that our 4 pro teams have on the city. Starting out, I wasn't very good with the camera settings such as the apeture and the shutter speed. However, after a lot of help from others such as my coaches, I learned how to use the different settings and my project really started to come together photo-wise. I photographed at a Red Sox game and got a lot of good shots, some of which ended up as part of my end-product. I got feedback that I wasn't shooting enough so the next time I went out to take pictures, I took tons. This set of pictures was taken at the site of the Marathon Bombings and at the makeshift memorial for victims of the tragedy. I took over 400 pictures this time around, many of which were really good and many of them ended up in my finished photo essay. As for the written portion of the projec, I reached out to a bunch of different people who I knew or had a connection to somehow and asked if they could help me with the project or at least let me interview them. I talked to the commisioner of the Pacific-12 conference, an executive VP in the Red Sox legal council, and a former Patriots player. I interviewed these three people about various subtopics that fit into the general theme of the connection between Boston sports and Boston.  After conducting these interviews, I read over what they said and gathered some great quotes that I ended up using in my final written piece. On the last thursday of the studio, I really sat down and started writing my article. I chose the title, "Wicked Sporty" because it was short and sweet and it involved the famous Boston colloquial usage of the term 'wicked' to mean 'very'. I wrote the piece reasonably quickly because it was on a topic that I love and a lot of it came quickly to mind. I decided to start and end the piece with a narrative of my experiences through my childhood at Gillette Stadium watching the Pats. After these decisions were all set in stone the rest of writing came easily to me and I was able to finish the article. I'm very proudl of how it turned out and I had greta time doing the studio. 

  • I remember the first time I took a photography class, it was the summer of 2007 and I was eleven. I don't remember much, but I do know there was something about snapping the shutter and hearing the click and the sounds and smell in the darkroom that I found to be relaxing. I know this because I still feel that way. The first time I took a digital photography class I was really skeptical that I wouldn't feel the same way that I felt towards film photography, and I was partially right. However when I learned that the NuVu studios was going to have a photography class I was really excited because I had recently been introduced to the concept of digital street photography and portraiture.

    It's because of the Local Narratives studio that I had the opportunity to use a digital camera and apply what I learned in the classroom to what I was going out to shoot in the streets. I re-learned the rules of thirds and other various photography skills. Though the rules didn't change, the way I was applying them to my work did. Instead of taking more scenic photos or photos with very obivous vocal points and shallow depth of field I was taking photos of people I met on the street. At first I was really hesitant and struggled with the aspect of approaching people I didn't know and taking photos without permission (and sometimes even with their permission.) I felt intrusive and afraid of what possible reactions I might get as a result. However as I week progressed I went home and read various articles written by really great and famous photographers explaining their approach to street photography. I learned that it does no good to be nervous or timid because if someone doesn't want their picture taken, they will just say so. I also learned a few tips about approaching possible subjects and asking if it's okay to photograph them.

    The following are a few tips I read about:

    • Accepting that people will say no
    • Remaining calm when approaching people (people tend to reflect other's emotions)
    • Speaking softly and not approaching from the back

     

    Unfortunately as I began to feel more and more comfortable the studio simultaneously began to wrap up. Overall I gained a greater appreciation for digital photography, street photography, street portrature, and the people that I am surrounded by daily. I wish there was more time for shooting and editing because it felt rushed towards the end but the coaches were great and really liked how my portfolio turned out.

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  • What stories lie just around the corner? What makes a story compelling? Is it the content? The medium? The storyteller? This studio will be an exploration of the various elements of visual and written documentary storytelling, in which students will venture outside the classroom to find and share stories from in and around Cambridge. By working with photography, audio, and the written word, students will discover a number of different ways to convey stories in a captivating and informative way.  Students post their work online in blog form as it progresses, allowing both them and others to track the evolution of their reporting over the course of the two weeks.