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  • My partner and i were thought of an idea to signal someone when they get a text while there charging there done. We thought of lights that turn different colors into a patter, an or an alarm that plays different music or a specific noise, but we thought there were already things like that. Then we had the idea of making it look like a snow globe but instead of using water we use wind from a fan. We also had the idea of being able to have a seasonal theme so we can have for winter snow, for spring flowers, and for fall leaves.  When the fan turns on the objects would fly in the container notifying that someone got a message.

    We based our modal after an Ikea product which originally was a decor and made it useful. The way it works is the is a little shelf that fits the size of a phone next to whatever outlet that the person is using and the shelf senses the vibration. That way the person knows they need to respond to a notification. And also that a person wouldn’t have to listen to an annoying sound ever time they got a text or look at a blinking light. 

  • The Biofeedback Posture Chair is, as the name implies, a chair that not only encourages good posture, but also gives live feedback through a "companion app" developed for the iPhone. It does this using pressure sensors located inside hard foam padding.

    Our intention was to hack furniture from IKEA, adding new functionality, either smart or physical. After several different ideas in similar veins, we decided we wanted to pursue a biofeedback device and eventually landed upon the idea of a chair that would detect posture.

    In our first brainstorm, we had plans to attach a lightbulb in the style of a reading chair, and only decided until much later in the project that we wouldn’t have time to add that functionality in during the studio. Our first prototypes were both scaled down cardboard models of our chair. We were just getting a feel for the layout of our chair and where different parts would be positioned.

    We then dove into software. Our first software iteration was a simple processing/arduino code that checked the pressure of each sensor showed pressure individually through brightness of the color. We then averaged those out into a fourth color. We later used this mainly for debugging purposes. The next step was to create a user interface for the iPhone after a couple of designs we landed upon one with a simple apple health-inspired UI. We made a design in Sketch and then actually started the programming process in Swift using Xcode. By the end we had a fully functional iPhone app that graphed all user input. 

    When we finally received the chair and assembled it, we could move on to creating our final product. We opted for a harder foam to preserve the sensors’ readings and added a very thin layer of squishy foam to give a better contact with the sensor, giving more sensitive feedback.

    In the end we had a project that both was functional, and had real world applications. Hopefully in the future we can continue work and find a way to get this technology to the public.

  • The Biofeedback Posture Chair is, as the name implies, a chair that not only encourages good posture, but also gives live feedback through a "companion app" developed for the iPhone. It does this using pressure sensors located inside hard foam padding.

    Our intention was to hack furniture from IKEA, adding new functionality, either smart or physical. After several different ideas in similar veins, we decided we wanted to pursue a biofeedback device and eventually landed upon the idea of a chair that would detect posture.

    In our first brainstorm, we had plans to attach a lightbulb in the style of a reading chair, and only decided until much later in the project that we wouldn’t have time to add that functionality in during the studio. Our first prototypes were both scaled down cardboard models of our chair. We were just getting a feel for the layout of our chair and where different parts would be positioned.

    We then dove into software. Our first software iteration was a simple processing/arduino code that checked the pressure of each sensor showed pressure individually through brightness of the color. We then averaged those out into a fourth color. We later used this mainly for debugging purposes. The next step was to create a user interface for the iPhone after a couple of designs we landed upon one with a simple apple health-inspired UI. We made a design in Sketch and then actually started the programming process in Swift using Xcode. By the end we had a fully functional iPhone app that graphed all user input. 

    When we finally received the chair and assembled it, we could move on to creating our final product. We opted for a harder foam to preserve the sensors’ readings and added a very thin layer of squishy foam to give a better contact with the sensor, giving more sensitive feedback.

    In the end we had a project that both was functional, and had real world applications. Hopefully in the future we can continue work and find a way to get this technology to the public.

  • This was our first model that we used out of cardboard and cling wrap . It worked better than the glass dome because we didn’t have a top to block the fan air from escaping allowing the leaves to float. When we tried it with the glass dome the leaves didn’t float because the air couldn’t escape. Luckily we figured out that the wind from the fan had to have some sort of opening on the sculpture so that air can leave, so we created a 3d modal on rhino so that the dome can slide in the ring. After we made it it worked just as well.

    Our project started with an idea to make getting notifactions from your phone easier. My parnter and I had the idea to connect an iphone to bluetooth and link it with a light on a chair. We decided to pivet our idea to make it more interactive. We started with the idea of a vertex used to make water tornados, neitherless we got a fan and went to work. Our first model had a big flat base with just a fan, the problem with this design was the piece of paper we used to float would get stuck and clog up the fan. Also the base was to big and the glass case didnt have any venting so the air had no where to go. Our second model we improved by adding a vetting system ontop of the fan, like a grate, to stop any pieces of paper from falling down. My parnter and I also designed the entire model to be smaller. 

    • Our project is the Messgaing Alert Device 
    • The problem we are sloving is to help with being alerted to when you have a text or someone is calling you, without having to carry around your phone with you around the house.
    • Wiht the messaging alert device you are able to leave your phone on a charing pad, when you a get your phone will vibrate which will send a signal to our alert model. This model is an interactive way to alert you, it a small vortex that creates a small wind tornado with either, leaves, flower pedals or snow. 
    • The design of our project was based off a wind turbin and a large water vortex machine. My partner and I developed a smaller version of a wind turbine. 
    • We relized further into our design that we needed a fliter and a vent to help the leaves blow more freely. We were able to produce a 3D printed vet and filter to alow air to vent through and help create the tornado we needed.
    • The major complucation that we had was figuring out the venting 
  • It is human nature to be curious, and that applies to every situation. Whether it is scientists searching through the depths of outer space, or a dog sniffing a tree in a new park, curiosity is inevitable. With this in mind, we designed the Lill Ridge to keep other people's curiosity out of your things. This desk can be used anywhere and by anyone. We chose to make a very minimal desk because moving it becomes a lot easier, and with a nice bamboo wood finish, it can look good in any setting. Some of our thoughts on the best uses are, the office to protect important documents. At home, to keep things hidden from your parents. At college, to keep more expensive things safe from people who walk in and out of the dorm room. These are just three of the many possible places to put the desk.

    We modified the LILLÅSEN IKEA desk but decided to do almost all of the modifications on the inside so the look of the desk stays simple and minimal to keep to the original design of the desk. The middle drawer has been cut down to accommodate the electronics. To help with cable management an extension cord was embedded under the desk. Unlike many other locking desks on the market we chose not to use a key, because keys are not very reliable. They can be copied or lost, and the lock can be picked by any amateur with a smartphone. Therefore, we chose to include two different types of codes. The first is a magnetic sensor inside the desk that is triggered with a magnet on the top. The second method, a keypad, is more secure because even if someone sees you pressing the numbers they will not be able to see what is being put in as the keypad is on the underside of the desk. Finally, because we know everyone has a few late nights every once in a while we added lights to each of the drawers so all of your items can easily be seen at any time of the day.

  • The Biofeedback Posture Chair is, as the name implies, a chair that not only encourages good posture, but also gives live feedback through a "companion app" developed for the iPhone. It does this using pressure sensors located inside hard foam padding.

    Our intention was to hack furniture from IKEA, adding new functionality, either smart or physical. After several different ideas in similar veins, we decided we wanted to pursue a biofeedback device and eventually landed upon the idea of a chair that would detect posture.

    In our first brainstorm, we had plans to attach a lightbulb in the style of a reading chair, and only decided until much later in the project that we wouldn’t have time to add that functionality in during the studio. Our first prototypes were both scaled down cardboard models of our chair. We were just getting a feel for the layout of our chair and where different parts would be positioned.

    We then dove into software. Our first software iteration was a simple processing/arduino code that checked the pressure of each sensor showed pressure individually through brightness of the color. We then averaged those out into a fourth color. We later used this mainly for debugging purposes. The next step was to create a user interface for the iPhone after a couple of designs we landed upon one with a simple apple health-inspired UI. We made a design in Sketch and then actually started the programming process in Swift using Xcode. By the end we had a fully functional iPhone app that graphed all user input. 

    When we finally received the chair and assembled it, we could move on to creating our final product. We opted for a harder foam to preserve the sensors’ readings and added a very thin layer of squishy foam to give a better contact with the sensor, giving more sensitive feedback.

    In the end we had a project that both was functional, and had real world applications. Hopefully in the future we can continue work and find a way to get this technology to the public.

  • Our context image is of the pixar animation called Geri's Game, where an old man plays chess against himself. The emotion of joy and excitement presented was something we wanted to emulate. We thought that the complexity of chess and how so any people know it, it would create a fun, but competitive enviroment would bring together passers by the most effictively.

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