Home
Student Gallery
Enrollment Summer 2019 Bioinfinity (Ages 11-13) Summer 2019 NuVu at MIT (Ages 14-18) Summer 2019 NuVu at MIT Residential Academic Year Program Summer 2019 PreVu 2 Innovation Camp For Educators 2019
About Us What is NuVu Calendar Team + Advisors Partners Blog Press Jobs Contact Us
Nuvu X What is NuVuX Offerings Partners
Reset Password
  • For the dispensing area of the Falafel Cart studio, we had to determine the best way to dispense ingredients onto a conveyor belt and by the end of the belt, have a delicious and complete falafel sandwhich. As the diagram above shows, the ingredients we needed to dispense in chronological order were a 7" bottom pita bread, a 6" falafel donut, tahini sauce, cucumbers, pickles, tomatoes, parsley, a secret ingredient (baba ghanouj), and finally a top piece of pita bread. To start the studio, we had to brainstorm all of the different ways of dispensing ingredients. We thought of soap dispensers, cereal dispensers, even bread dispensers. We then researched how each of these dispensers worked and manipulated them for our needs. We started by doing hours of brainstorming trying to come up with many ways to solve the same problem. After coming up with scaled diagrams we then turned to our computers and started to design and prototype. We spent many days working with the same exact prints trying to make them work and slowly improving on our latest model. We repeated this process for the two weeks until by the end we came up with a great way to dispense each individual ingredient. For the bread and falafel we made a simple design that allowed certain plates to shift opening up a hole for a falafel or piece of bread to drop through. For the cucumber, pickles, parsley, and tomatoes, we followed through on creating a cereal dispenser to release each ingredient into a funnel which would then dispense onto the conveyor belt. Lastly, for the baba ganouj and the tahini sauce, we ended up with two separate designs, both using similar non return valve systems. We opted for a press system for the baba ganoush dispensing as it only needed to be dispensed over the center of the falafel sandwich. We decided to use a squeeze bottle for the tahini dispersal, since it had to cover a large area of the sandwich. Both of these were going to be atop a spinning ring that allows the tahini to surround the falafel, while also allowing the baba ganoush to remain stationary.  Of course, due to a time constraint, some mechanisms were further progressed than others. 

  • We wanted to make a donut shaped falafel so that the falafel is evenly distributed when you take a bite. Our Ofalafel mold shapes falafel mix into ready-to-bake falafel donuts. Once baked, just 2 minutes of frying makes them crispy and ready to eat.

    Falafel mix is placed in the bottom, then the mold is flipped onto a baking tray. The falafel is separated with a knife, ready to be baked. Once it’s been baked, it can be transported to the falafel cart and stored. When a customer orders a falafel sandwich, it can be fried quickly and easily.


    Our team continued a previous studio’s efforts to make a functioning donut falafel cart. On the first day of the studio we broke up into four different groups to work on specific parts of the cart and I decided to work on the mold. The mold is a very important part of the falafel making experience because it makes it different from all the other falafel making companies. We believe that our falafel mold creates great falafel that equally disperses the flavors throughout the sandwich, because our falafel are shaped like donuts. You'll never end up with a bite that has no falafel followed by one with nothing but falafel.

    The mold is made up of two 3D printed pieces that are attached. The mold has a handle on the side that allows you to push up the inner part of the mold. The inner mold is detachable so that you can easily separate the falafel from the mold once it had been pushed out.

    The original design of the donut falafel mold was very similar to the existing falafel mold. We wanted the user to place the falafel in the mold and then have a spring released so that the “plunge” in the middle would come out and would create the donut shape. After we began modeling it and doing many sketches we realized that this wouldn’t work so well mechanically, since the original design relies on not having anything at the center. We went back to brainstorming. Our second idea was similar to the first, in that the user would place the falafel mix around the plunger at the center. Instead of pushing the falafel out and sliding it off the mold, in our second design the mold would split in two and drop the falafel out. However, after testing this design in real life we found that the falafel mix would not separate from the sides of the mold, so we decided to go return to our original idea and make some changes. Our final idea was very similar to the original, but attached the part that pushes the falafel out at three points outside of the center to leave room for the plunger. We printed it and found that it worked, but the spring made the motion more awkward. We removed it and everything worked smoothly and easily!


    Throughout the project we spent lots of our time considering the mechanics of the mold because of how unusual our falafel shape is. We also had a hard time getting the molds to work and having to come up with new ideas when they didn't. 

     

  • Falafel is great, but it can get messy while eating and it needs something to hold it all together.

    Our Ofalafel packaging makes it easier to hold the falafel and keep it in one piece while eating.

    Our packaging is made of cardboard so it is able to absorb anything that drips out of the falafel like the Tahini sauce of the Baba ganoush . It has a piece that connects the two halves so that when you are ready to open up the box even more you are able to pop it and it opens.

    Our team began the studio breaking up into four groups. Originally, Sam had chosen to work on the packaging and I on the mold, but in the end we collaborated and worked on both. We began by researching unique packaging and the purposes that they served and decided to take parts to formulate our package. We wanted to make the packaging very similar to the shape of the falafel sandwich because we wanted to show how different it was and make it recognizable. After we decided on a design we went onto Rhino modeled it and laser cut it out of cardboard.

    The package is in the shape of an arc with the top open. There is a small piece that holds the packaging in the center to keep it all together. When the person eating the falafel sandwich has gotten down to the packaging they are able to pop it open and continue eating without having to take the sandwich out. The packaging has the ability to be joined with another one if someone decides to take away the sandwich for later.

    We wanted the falafel to be attractive so that if someone saw a person on the street with one , they would want to ask where they got it from. We spent a lot of time focusing on making sure that the packaging would be strong enough to support the falafel and make it very easy to eat. We experimented with the materials such as cardstock and regular paper, but the laser cutter kept messing up on the cuts and we felt that neither of those materials would be strong enough for the sandwiches.


    One minor challenge that we faced was getting the size of the falafel right. When we first started out the falafel was a lot larger in diameter so we had to figure out the right dimensions to fit the new sized falafel snugly. To do this we had to go back into Rhino and change all the dimensions and choose the pieces to etch or cut so that it could fold properly.

     

  • Falafel is great, but it can get messy while eating and it needs something to hold it all together.

    Our Ofalafel packaging makes it easier to hold the falafel and keep it in one piece while eating.

    Our packaging is made of cardboard so it is able to absorb anything that drips out of the falafel like the Tahini sauce of the Baba ganoush . It has a piece that connects the two halves so that when you are ready to open up the box even more you are able to pop it and it opens.

    Our team began the studio breaking up into four groups. Originally, Sam had chosen to work on the packaging and I on the mold, but in the end we collaborated and worked on both. We began by researching unique packaging and the purposes that they served and decided to take parts to formulate our package. We wanted to make the packaging very similar to the shape of the falafel sandwich because we wanted to show how different it was and make it recognizable. After we decided on a design we went onto Rhino modeled it and laser cut it out of cardboard.

    The package is in the shape of an arc with the top open. There is a small piece that holds the packaging in the center to keep it all together. When the person eating the falafel sandwich has gotten down to the packaging they are able to pop it open and continue eating without having to take the sandwich out. The packaging has the ability to be joined with another one if someone decides to take away the sandwich for later.

    We wanted the falafel to be attractive so that if someone saw a person on the street with one , they would want to ask where they got it from. We spent a lot of time focusing on making sure that the packaging would be strong enough to support the falafel and make it very easy to eat. We experimented with the materials such as cardstock and regular paper, but the laser cutter kept messing up on the cuts and we felt that neither of those materials would be strong enough for the sandwiches.


    One minor challenge that we faced was getting the size of the falafel right. When we first started out the falafel was a lot larger in diameter so we had to figure out the right dimensions to fit the new sized falafel snugly. To do this we had to go back into Rhino and change all the dimensions and choose the pieces to etch or cut so that it could fold properly.

    Iterations :

    1. For our first iteration, we created a design on Rhino that what two arcs  with a rectangle down the middle so that when you folded it it was a arc with the top open. To connect the package we hot glued the sides to the rectangle in the middle. However the pieces in the middle didn’t stay in position and would flop around so we labeled the package ineffective and went back to brainstorming.

    2.  For the second iteration we made the design out of cardstock and kept the design the same  for the most part, but we made etches in the rectangular part to make it easier to fold. The laser cutter kept messing up the cut and would cut all the pieces instead of etching and cutting. Once we finally go the laser cutter to make the right cut we decided that the cardstock wasn’t strong enough even though it was thick and could bend well.

    3. For the 3rd iteration, we halved the size of the packaging because we made the falafel smaller. We added in a piece in the center  that would connect the two halves of the arc so that the packaging wouldn’t flop around. This way the person eating the falafel would be able to choose how much of the falafel was covered.




     

  • Currently, there are not any high quality falafel carts in the Cambridge area.  We set out to solve this issue by creating a very efficient and interesting design that also had amazing falafels.  Our group focused on the chassis.  We designed the whole structure and frame, planning everything out to be the most efficient, appealing cart.  One of the most interesting things about it is the shape.  It is a circle, with an inner semi-circle.  This shape allows the vendor to roll the entire cart, end over end, while the inner half-circle stays level.  That inner circle, where all of the table space is, always stays parallel to the ground.  This alluring design makes the cart very portable and attracts the attention of pedestrians, as an added benefit.

    We felt like we could make very good falafel, and we wanted to maximize the number of people who could experience it.  We decided that the best way to do this was by making a falafel cart.  We chose to make it round, in the shape of a falafel.  There are two sections: the outer circular frame and the inner semicircle.  The two outer circles are constructed using four sheets of 1/2-in plywood.  They all have an exterior diameter of 6ft, 7in.  The outermost circle (the one that everybody sees) is 6in thick, while the ones behind it are 4in.  This allows us to make a track for the wheels on the semicircle to rotate.  The inner semicircle is sandwiched in between the outer two circles.  The outer circles are held, equally spaced, by support rods that are 28in long and threaded through holes in the circles.  There are four wheels placed in optimal locations, on each side of the semicircle.  When the cart rolls, the wheels on the inside spin, allowing the countertop to stay level.  It was a challenge to design the chassis, but we steadily worked through the issues.  The biggest problem we faced was time.  We did not have enough time to build the cart in full scale, which was the original goal.  It also took a while to check over all of our work.  We had to sure make everything was perfect before sending the files out to get cut.  In the end, we sent our pieces to be cut and created a fully assembled, 1/4 scale model.

  • We wanted to make a donut shaped falafel so that the falafel is evenly distributed when you take a bite. Our Ofalafel mold shapes falafel mix into ready-to-bake falafel donuts. Once baked, just 2 minutes of frying makes them crispy and ready to eat.

    Falafel mix is placed in the bottom, then the mold is flipped onto a baking tray. The falafel is separated with a knife, ready to be baked. Once it’s been baked, it can be transported to the falafel cart and stored. When a customer orders a falafel sandwich, it can be fried quickly and easily.


    Our team continued a previous studio’s efforts to make a functioning donut falafel cart. On the first day of the studio we broke up into four different groups to work on specific parts of the cart and I decided to work on the mold. The mold is a very important part of the falafel making experience because it makes it different from all the other falafel making companies. We believe that our falafel mold creates great falafel that equally disperses the flavors throughout the sandwich, because our falafel are shaped like donuts. You'll never end up with a bite that has no falafel followed by one with nothing but falafel.

    The mold is made up of two 3D printed pieces that are attached. The mold has a handle on the side that allows you to push up the inner part of the mold. The inner mold is detachable so that you can easily separate the falafel from the mold once it had been pushed out.

    The original design of the donut falafel mold was very similar to the existing falafel mold. We wanted the user to place the falafel in the mold and then have a spring released so that the “plunge” in the middle would come out and would create the donut shape. After we began modeling it and doing many sketches we realized that this wouldn’t work so well mechanically, since the original design relies on not having anything at the center. We went back to brainstorming. Our second idea was similar to the first, in that the user would place the falafel mix around the plunger at the center. Instead of pushing the falafel out and sliding it off the mold, in our second design the mold would split in two and drop the falafel out. However, after testing this design in real life we found that the falafel mix would not separate from the sides of the mold, so we decided to go return to our original idea and make some changes. Our final idea was very similar to the original, but attached the part that pushes the falafel out at three points outside of the center to leave room for the plunger. We printed it and found that it worked, but the spring made the motion more awkward. We removed it and everything worked smoothly and easily!


    Throughout the project we spent lots of our time considering the mechanics of the mold because of how unusual our falafel shape is.

    Iterations

    1. For our first iteration, we completely changed from the original falafel dispenser mold and decided to make something that was similar to the play-doh mold. We 3D printed three different parts that were secured with a screw. The basis of the new design was that you would hold together the mold and place in the falafel mix and then flip it over and the falafel would drop out in the shape of a donut.
    2. For our second iteration, we halved the size of the mold because we felt that it was very large and added in handles to make it easier to hold. We added in the spring steel to make it harder to open the mold and keep the falafel mix together more. We also added in a little notch to secure the mold together when it was closed. After we tested this it was a complete failure so we felt that we had to go back and fabricate a new idea.
    3. We completely changed the idea from the last one and made it very similar to the existing falafel dispenser. We 3D printed two pieces, the inner mold and the outer mold. When you pushed on the handle the inner mold would move upward, allowing space for the mold to be filled with falafel mix. After filling you remove the outer mold and with a knife slice the falafel off of the inner mold. Once you have done this the mold is ready to go.

     

  • next