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  • Samantha's Brief:

    A wearable rotating piece capturing the themes of self-identity and culture. 

    The project captured the work of Marka27 and specifically his mural called Queendom. Most of his work relates to cultural expression. His work also captures the clear divide between someone's internal cultural identity and what they choose to show to the world. Meet The Queen is a wearable designed to capture both aspects of identity and make the act of opening up in the control of the wearer. Marka27 also uses geometric shapes to frame the subject of his art. 

    Two rotating triangular pieces of wood serve as frames, inside of which bioplastic material is collaged with fabrics, colors, animal prints, and other design elements abstracted from the mural. The triangular frames are attached to a rotating bolt on a sturdy belt. When the pieces are in the upward position, the model's face is mostly covered, representing privacy and self-reflection. When the triangles are moved to the outward pointing position, they frame the upper half of the model's body just like in the mural. The final position, in which the triangles are pointing downward to create a skirt, is for when the wearer is confident and ready to show their whole self. The goal of this project is for anyone who wants to witness or demonstrate different sides of their culture and identity. Included in Queendom are aspects of the woman's African-American culture such as animal prints. These aspects are also included inside the bioplastic triangles placed to show her hiding some of these parts of herself.

  • Kata Khakali

    The opposing concepts of movement and stillness are difficult to combine in a work of art. Transcend is a mural by Cedric Douglas and Julia Roth, on the Green Street Garage, in Central Square, Cambridge, that does so beautifully. Its many colorful geometric shapes on the parameter contrast with a black-and-white still portrait of an African-American female. Vibrant colors create the feeling of movement and positivity, while the still portrait invites contemplation: a unique combination that immediately catches the eye.

    Inspired by Transcend, Hurricane Dress was designed to capture this contrast between movement and stillness by evoking the natural phenomenon of the calm, still eye of a hurricane. On the top and bottom of the dress, swirling shapes, traced specifically by the map of hurricane Maria.  The shapes smoothly transition to a tight corset that is slim-fitting that represents the eye of the storm. Hurricane Dress highlights and celebrates the difference between the aspects of life directed toward chaos, and those that create peace.  Even though the two concepts of movement and stillness are the complete polar opposites and the individual dealing with these two traits might feel confused or overwhelmed, but they have the ability to combine them to form a beautiful creation. 

    Annika Hardy
    The Hurricane Dress: a wearable sculpture inspired by the shape and nature of a hurricane. While the top and bottom of the design are busy, layered and mobile, the center of the garment acts as the eye of the storm and stays still, calm and stiff.

    Inspired by the mural Transcend, painted by Cedric Douglas and Julia Roth, the Hurricane Dress explores the sense of calm in chaos, created in the mural through the contrast of a vibrant, colorful, geometric pattern with a still, realistic black-and-white portrait of a woman's eyes. The pattern seems animated and moveable while the woman's eyes appear calm and static, with the movement and stillness playing off each other. The Hurricane Dress aims to capture this effect of stillness within a chaotic environment. Hurricanes are defined by their high winds and chaotic movement that circle around a static, calm center known as the eye.

    In the wearable Hurricane Dress, the contrast between movement and stillness is made through having a flexible top and bottom of the garment with a fixed middle. This effect is achieved by having large pieces of Rowlux, a stiff material used for diffusing light, cut to resemble strong winds or severe weather on the top and bottom of the outfit that move back and forth as the wearer walks. The calm middle of the dress, the "eye of the storm," is created with a tight corset in the center of the sculpture that stays put while the rest of the piece moves around. While wearing this dress, the model may feel centered and chaotic at the same time, showing that sometimes the tension or opposition between traits can be what makes them work well together.

  • Portfolio Day

    After the Final Presentation, you have the opportunity to consider your presentation in light of final feedback and discussion. You will spend additional time reviewing you presentations, refining you portfolio, and polishing you work before it is made public on the internet.

    The Self Evaluation is an opportunity for you to reflect on your work during the Studio. Students and Coaches receive the same prompts and categories, and the students will evaluate their own progress and skill levels in Design Skills and Subject Skills applicable to the studio both numerically and textually. Through a narrative, you will also reflect on the quality and rigor of your work, give feedback on the studio, and have the opportunity to receive similar feedback directly from the coach.

  • Samantha's Brief:

    A wearable rotating piece capturing the themes of self-identity and culture. 

    The project captured the work of Marka27 and specifically his mural called Queendom. Most of his work relates to cultural expression. His work also captures the clear divide between someone's internal cultural identity and what they choose to show to the world. Meet The Queen is a wearable designed to capture both aspects of identity and make the act of opening up in the control of the wearer. Marka27 also uses geometric shapes to frame the subject of his art. 

    Two rotating triangular pieces of wood serve as frames, inside of which bioplastic material is collaged with fabrics, colors, animal prints, and other design elements abstracted from the mural. The triangular frames are attached to a rotating bolt on a sturdy belt. When the pieces are in the upward position, the model's face is mostly covered, representing privacy and self-reflection. When the triangles are moved to the outward pointing position, they frame the upper half of the model's body just like in the mural. The final position, in which the triangles are pointing downward to create a skirt, is for when the wearer is confident and ready to show their whole self. The goal of this project is for anyone who wants to witness or demonstrate different sides of their culture and identity. Included in Queendom are aspects of the woman's African-American culture such as animal prints. These aspects are also included inside the bioplastic triangles placed to show her hiding some of these parts of herself.

  • Beatrix's Brief

    Pigeons.: a wearable sculpture that takes inspiration from a Central Square mural by Felipe Ortiz, and explores the perceptions of nature and urbanity by using pigeons as a primary example. Pigeons. is made of feather “fans”, with an outside brick-colored feather to represent urbanity that pans out to reveal differently colored feathers with unique textures to represent the wonder, beauty and nature found when you look below the surface of the city. This project exists to change people’s views on the merging of nature and urbanity: every “front feather” is monotone and dull, but when someone looks closer by opening the fans, they will see the beautiful and different patterns. By training them to look closer to find real beauty, they will go out to the city and look closer at pigeons and urbanity to discover the beauty and nature behind it.

    In this project, my partner and I chose two main patterns. The “front feathers” are all the same: brick-colored spray painted feathers. The other category, “unique feathers,” has four different patterns embedded in a wooden feather-shaped frame: lace, blue fabric, gold mesh, and mirrored acrylic, designed to reflect the color palette shown in the mural. Each front feather has two random unique feathers beneath it— for example, blue and lace, or gold and acrylic. They are attached with a screw that allows the feathers to fan out but keep their shape, and are connected to a felt harness worn on the thigh.

  • Brief - Adam Drizen:

    A cylinder dress that explores the impact of social media through the use of icons and logos. Inspired by #TAG Street Art, the dress progressively expands representing how as the population grows, individuals become more entangled in social media. 

    As the centuries have turned, social media has swallowed the population. Many are found putting on a facade or being two-faced. Currently, 80% of the U.S population has a profile on at least one social media platform and spends over three hours a day on these platforms. As people become obsessed with communicating through photos and videos, they don't realize that they are withdrawing from social interactions in person and the harmful effect this has on society. Many would expect social interactions to grow, but as the population increases, so do social media users. The dress is an abstract way of showing a significant issue regarding our country today.

    Brief - Zoe Falkson:

    The Time Cape: A large, cylindrical cape that represents social media’s effect on in-person socializing. Made from several pieces of laser-cut wood and fabric, the social media icons on the cape resemble a hombre compactness.

    While social media makes it possible to interact with people from all across the globe, this advancement in technology inhibits face-to-face socialization. The goal of the Time Cape is to represent and inform the public of this dilemma by contrasting the precipitous rise in social media with the sudden downfall in social interaction, specifically among millennials and post-millennials.

    The Time Cape is constructed from several pieces of circularly shaped wood to form the exponential shape of the cape to mimic the rise in social media. In contrast, the pattern of the social media icons becomes sparser toward the bottom of the cape, to represent the decrease in social interaction. The hope is that when millennial and post-millennials see this cape, they will recognize the negative impact social media platforms have on interaction in the real world.

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  • يهدف استوديو (أزياء الشوارع) إلى التعبير عن أفكار وثقافات مختلفة من المحيط المجتمعي، من قصص الشارع ومن الفنون المعروضة فيه والتعبير عن هذه الأفكار والقصص والفنون من خلال قطع ملبوسة تعبّر عن صورتنا الذاتية أو وجهات نظر ابداعية، فردية أو سياسية، بغض النظر عن جزئية هذه القطع فقد تكون لباس للرأس أو للرقبة أو للجسم كاملاً أو لليدين أو القدمين.

    في هذا الاستوديو ، سيقوم الطلاب بالبحث واستكشاف "فن الشارع"  ، والتعرف على الفنانين (إن أمكن) والرسائل الفنية كمصدر إلهام لإنشاء "Street Couture" - "أزياء الشارع" أو الأزياء المعمارية الراقية التي تفسر فكر الفنان. 

    سوف يستكشف الطلاب في هذا الاستوديو فنانو الشوارع المحليين في الساحة المركزية في كامبريدج وفي حي كاراكوي -  اسطنبول وينخرطون في استكشافات مفاهيمية ومادية دقيقة لتشكيل منتج ملبوس معماري قابلة للارتداء يعبّر عن فنون الشارع وعمّا يحصل في المجتمع من قصص وأحداث أو أفكار تعبيرية أخرى.

    هذا الاستوديو هو استوديو تبادل بين بيت كرم - اسطنبول وبين مدرسة نوفو الاميركية، سيقوم الطلاب من خلاله بعرض مشاريعهم مع نظرائهم من المدرسة الأخرى والتعرف على الأفكار ووجهات النظر والثقافات المختلفة.

  • Part art form, part commentary, fashion is a public-facing billboard for our self image, political views and creative individuality. Synchronously, street art has been a medium for artists to reach the public sector in an uninhibited and sometimes confrontational manner. From Banksy’s murals to Mademoiselle Maurice origami cranes on the walls of Paris, to formal and informal street art in our towns, street artists use the unconventional as their canvas and in doing so incite controversy, awe, humor and pause.

    In this studio, students will research and explore local street art, learn about the artists (if possible) and messaging as inspiration to create “Street Couture,” or high fashion architectural wearables which interpret the artist’s work. Students will explore their local street artists in Central Square in Cambridge and Karakoy in Istanbul and engage in a rigorous conceptual and material exploration to form architectural wearables. 

  • Portfolio Day

    After the Final Presentation, you have the opportunity to consider your presentation in light of final feedback and discussion. You will spend additional time reviewing you presentations, refining you portfolio, and polishing you work before it is made public on the internet.

    The Self Evaluation is an opportunity for you to reflect on your work during the Studio. Students and Coaches receive the same prompts and categories, and the students will evaluate their own progress and skill levels in Design Skills and Subject Skills applicable to the studio both numerically and textually. Through a narrative, you will also reflect on the quality and rigor of your work, give feedback on the studio, and have the opportunity to receive similar feedback directly from the coach.