Presentation Board

Max Allen
1 / 1


The Still Chimes: a water-powered kinetic sculpture that is designed to provide a sense of normality and entertainment in disaster scenarios. Chimes are played on an interval as the gradual condensation of water from a still drips into the mechanism.

This Still Chimes are designed to provide a sense of normality for people who are trying to survive in disaster scenarios. Water from a still will drip into a cup which, when full, dumps its content into a water wheel which powers the chimes. The Still Chimes provide a relaxing sculpture to watch and listen to and act as a timer that keeps track of the amount of clean water being produced.

Process

Louie Adamian and Satchel Sieniewicz
1 / 14

The Inflatable Shelter: a lightweight inexpensive shelter for displaced people that attempts to improve their quality of life by offering thermal insulation.   

There are over 12 million Syrians forcibly displaced from their homes, and over 25 million refugees worldwide. Refugees' quality of life is often overlooked.: people do not think about what it is like to live in a refugee camp in a tent with no utilities or amenities. The Inflatable Shelter is made from Tyvek and Mylar to be inexpensive and light, and the air bladders that inflate to offer thermal insulation. The initial prototype focused on the tent material and form, and on different methods of adhering the Tyvek and Mylar together. A large portion of design time was spent on exploring different methods of adhering the Tyvek and mylar together. Future versions will integrate more features into the design to make the tent more like a modern house, including. Flexible solar panels on the tent roof to charge batteries that will power LED lights embedded into the walls of the tent.

The two materials need to be strong enough to handle being outside all the time, the adhesive needs to be flexible so the fabric is still flexible., and the gap between the two should be as small as possible so the material can fold up to flat pack or be stuffed in a bag.

The SmokeBombER

Amiyr Ahmad and Aveen Nagpal
1 / 21

Aveen: SmokeBombER is a cheap smoke bomb launcher that can be used signal for help using highly available resources in disaster scenarios such as the recent tornados in Puerto Rico and Florida. The SmokeBombER can be made on a laser cutter or by hand (with a template) and then packed into a cardboard tube; this makes it easy to mass produce and allows simple delivery by air or land. Unlike other, more industrial, launchers, this launcher doesn't need a self-propelled cartridge to launch the payload into the air for an easy "DIYable" smoke bomb that can be made with various household ingredients. To make a smoke bomb, the user simply mixes an oxidizer (ammonium nitrate from ice packs, potassium permanganate or chlorine from pool supplies), sawdust, and machine oil (easily salvageable from cars), and packs it into a small provided cartridge then, using a fuse, the smoke will be released. Once launched, the cartridge will unravel a parachute that will slow the descent of the smoke bomb, allowing for easier spotting by emergency services. There was a worry that the SmokeBombER could be used with a malicious intent, however, unlike a flare, this device doesn't use phosphorus burning at 2000F and instead uses a harmless PVC cartridge that could at the most bruise.

Movie

Kevin Brown
1 / 1

Presentation

Max Allen and pierre Belizaire
1 / 21

The Still Chime: a water-powered kinetic sculpture that makes music to help natural disaster victims cope with their loss.

 

Due to climate change, there has been an increase in the number and severity of hurricanes.  More and more people are suffering from the catastrophe the storms are leaving behind. The Still Chime will help natural disaster victims who lost their homes and who are suffering from stress, PTSD, anxiety or depression.

This simple and low tech contraption is made out of bicycle parts, plexiglass, wood screws, PVC, steel pipes, and fishermen's wire. The victims operate it by simply pouring in water found from creeks, rivers, ponds, or lakes that turns a water wheel; the water then activates the movement of the mill that moves a timing belt connected to a cylinder with multiple holes that hold pegs. As the cylinder turns, the pegs hit the metal chimes that make soothing sounds. The Still Chimes sounds are not fixed, so they don't become tiresome; the pegs can manually be pulled out and put into different holes to create different sounds.

1 / 1

THE PRESENTATION POST

This post's privacy is set to Everyone. This post showcases your final design by telling the comprehensive story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested. The arc of the story should encompass the, How of your project in a compelling narrative. It showcases your design process including your brainstorming, each of your iterations, and your final prototype. It allows the viewer to delve deeply into your process.

  • Every Slide should have a Title and Caption.
    The body of this post is The Brief. You should include a version of the Brief for each collaborator in the project.
  • This post will be used in your review presentation at the end of the session.

You are encouraged to make your narrative as compelling as possible. All of the content below should be included, but if you would like to rearrange the material in order to tell your story differently, work with your coach.


INTRODUCTION PORTION

Your presentation is a narrative, and the introduction sets up the scene for that story. Here you introduce the project, say why it is important, and summarize what you did.

TITLE WITH TAGLINE: This slides shows a crisp, clear final image and the title of your project. with a pithy blurb describing the project. The image, name, and tagline should draw a viewer in. 

Examples:

  • The Fruit - A line following, light tracking robot
  • Segmented Vehicle - A vehicle that conforms to the landscape
  • Cacoon - Wearable sculpture exploring the concept of transformation and death

EVOCATIVE  IMAGE: This is a single image that shows a clear image that evokes the soul of your project. This image helps set up the why in a compelling way, sets the stage for your narrative, and will help frame the entire presentation. The caption of this slide (set with the Edit Captions button when editing your post) should discuss the context of your project. No Text on the slide.

THESIS STATEMENT: This is a TEXT ONLY slide for which briefly describes the Soul and Body of your project. You can use the project description from your Brief or write something new. This statement ties together your narrative.

Examples:

  • The Cocoon:  A wearable sculpture that explores the concept of transformations and death. The Cocoon explores the spiritual journey beyond the human experience; what it means to be human, how wonder effects us, and the concept of what happens after death.
  • Body Accordion: A musical prosthetic that translates the wearer’s body movements into a dynamic multimedia performance. The Body Accordion converts flex sensor input to sound through Arduino, MaxMSP, and Ableton Live. 
  • Seed to Soup Animation: A whimsical animation about the slow food movement. Seed to Soup showcases a holistic method of cooking. From garden, to kitchen, to dinner table.
  • Antlers: A wearable sculpture inspired by antlers found in the deer and antelope family. "Antlers" explores the comparison between armor and attraction. 

PROCESS PORTION

The Process Portion of your presentation tells the story of how you iteratively developed your project. Somewhere in that story you should include conceptual and technical precedents that guided you at each stage as well as brainstorming and process sketches and clear photo booth imagery for 3-4 stages of your process.

This portion is made up of three types of slides repeated 3-4 times. Each iteration in your process should include:

  • PRECEDENTS:  Precedents are any projects that inspired you creatively or gave you technical guidance. These can include conceptual precedents and technical precedents. No Text.
  • SKETCHES/SKETCH CONCEPT DIAGRAMS: These slides show your generative ideas in sketch form. These should clean, clear drawings. A sketch should show a clear idea. Do not simply scan a messy sketchbook page and expect that people will understand. If you do not have a clear concept or working sketches it is fine to make them after the fact. No Text.
  • PROTOTYPE IMAGES:  These are actual images of the prototypes  you documented in your daily posts. These images illustrate your design decisions and how your project changed at each step. No Text.

FINAL PORTION

The Final stage of your presentation is the resolution of your narrative and shows your completed work. The use diagram shows how your project works and the construction diagram shows how it is assembled. Final photos show the project both in action and at rest. The imagery captures your final built design.

USE DIAGRAM: A diagram showing some aspect of the functionality. These can include:

  • How one uses or interacts with the project
  • The overall behavior of the project over time
  • For a complex interactive project, this can be a clear diagram of the software behavior

MECHANICAL DIAGRAM:  A diagram offering insight on how the project is put together and functions technically.

  • Ideally, this will be an exploded axonometric
  • At minimum this can be a labeled disassembled photo  

ELECTRONICS or OTHER DIAGRAM: Additional diagrams showing some important aspect of your design. 

IMAGERY: The last slides should have an images of the final project. These images should be taken in the photo booth, cropped, and adjusted for contrast, brightness, etc. Images should include:

  • An image of the project in use (taken in the booth or at large). This should include a human interacting with the project.
  • Images of project alone. Include at least one overall image and one detail image.
  • You can also use an image In-Use. 
  • Consider using a GIF to show how the project works. 

 

The Brief - Part 1 - Outline

Andrew Todd Marcus

Due tomorrow morning, please upload Part 1 Tuesday morning. The Instructions are below.


POST INTO "WRITING" SECTION OF YOUR "PROJECT" ON THE WEBSITE

----------------------------------------------

The Brief - Part 1 - Outline

As part of your portfolio for each studio, you will be asked to write a Brief for your project. The Brief is a written piece that will accompany your presentation and is a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What of your project.

------Copy & Paste this section below into a new post and answer ALL of the questions completely ---- 

The Brief Part 1 - Outline

Answer the following questions in full, complete sentences. Title the post "Brief Outline" and post it in the Writing Tab of your Project. Every student must do this assignment. Cut and paste the assignment below and write your answers below each point. You must respond to ALL items (#4 can be skipped if there is no individual client). Click Shift-Return to start a new line.

  1. Write a A 1-2 sentence project description. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. 
    1. What is the "soul" of your project? Describe the idea of the project in conceptual terms. This should paint a conceptual picture in the readers mind. (1 sentences)
    2. What is the "body" of your project? Describe the basic technical or physical construction of the project. This should NOT go into excessive detail, just provide an overview. Describe the project to someone with no technical knowledge in as few words as possible. The reader should be able to envision what the project looks like. ( sentences)

      Examples:
      Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
      Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
  2. Why does your project exist? The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – 
    1. What social issue does your project engage? (1 sentence)
    2. Who is your project helping?  (1 sentence)
    3. How does the project change the world? This can be in a simple physical way or in a complex social way. (1 sentence)
    4. What important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? (1 sentence)
  3. Who is the project for? Who will use it and in what context (1 sentence)
  4.   If you are designing for a specific person, answer the following:
    1. What is the client's name and what is their medical condition, if any? (1 sentence)
    2. How does their condition relate to your project? Include concise and compelling information about the client you are working with, their condition, and how that relates to your project design. (1 sentence)
    3. What is their personality like and how does it inform your design process? (1 sentence)
  5. How does your project work. In non-jargonistic language, answer the following 
    1. What is the basic technology behind your project? (1 sentence)
    2. What is technically innovative about your project? How does it differ from existing technology? (1 sentence)
    3. How does a user physically and mentally interact with the project? (1-2 sentences)

The Brief - Part 1 - Outline

Andrew Todd Marcus


The Brief - Part 1 - Outline

As part of your portfolio for each studio, you will be asked to write a Brief for your project. The Brief is a written piece that will accompany your presentation and is a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What of your project through clear, cogent writing. It tells the story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested.

For students at NuVu Cambridge, to help you develop your writing, Rebecca, the NuVu writing coach, will provide feedback throughout the process. Rebecca is a published writer, a professional editor, and a teacher of writing. Her assistance is invaluable in developing your written communication skills. She will expect hard work and thoughtful writing and respond with thorough feedback on content and style.

------Copy & Paste this section below into a new post and answer ALL of the questions completely ---- 

The Brief Part 1 - Outline

Answer the following questions in full, complete sentences. Title the post "Brief Outline" and post it in the Writing Tab of your Project. Every student must do this assignment. Cut and paste the assignment below and write your answers below each point. You must respond to ALL items (#4 can be skipped if there is no individual client). Click Shift-Return to start a new line.

  1. Write a A 1-2 sentence project description. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. 
    1. What is the "soul" of your project? Describe the idea of the project in conceptual terms. This should paint a conceptual picture in the readers mind. (1 sentences)
    2. What is the "body" of your project? Describe the basic technical or physical construction of the project. This should NOT go into excessive detail, just provide an overview. Describe the project to someone with no technical knowledge in as few words as possible. The reader should be able to envision what the project looks like. ( sentences)

      Examples:
      Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
      Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
  2. Why does your project exist? The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – 
    1. What social issue does your project engage? (1 sentence)
    2. Who is your project helping?  (1 sentence)
    3. How does the project change the world? This can be in a simple physical way or in a complex social way. (1 sentence)
    4. What important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? (1 sentence)
  3. Who is the project for? Who will use it and in what context (1 sentence)
  4.   If you are designing for a specific person, answer the following:
    1. What is the client's name and what is their medical condition, if any? (1 sentence)
    2. How does their condition relate to your project? Include concise and compelling information about the client you are working with, their condition, and how that relates to your project design. (1 sentence)
    3. What is their personality like and how does it inform your design process? (1 sentence)
  5. How does your project work. In non-jargonistic language, answer the following 
    1. What is the basic technology behind your project? (1 sentence)
    2. What is technically innovative about your project? How does it differ from existing technology? (1 sentence)
    3. How does a user physically and mentally interact with the project? (1-2 sentences)

Presentation Instructions

Andrew Todd Marcus
1 / 2

You will be creating your presentation on the NuVu Platform.

Things to do/think about:

  • Your presentation should be located in the Portfolio tab of your project.
  • There should be (1) post titled with The Name of Your Project with all of the slides.
  • You should have (1) post of a video of your project in action. Chances are people wont be able to see your work from and we can project a video of your project working.
  • All slides should have a title. You can add titles when editing the post
  • With the exception of the Title slide NO TEXT SHOULD APPEAR ON YOUR SLIDES.
  • Only (1) image per slide. Images should be uploaded directly. Make sure that the images aren't pixelated! NO GOOGLE DOCS!!!
  • Be sure to add your team members as collaborators and make the (2) posts Public.
  • Only one team member can edit a post at a time!
  • Presentations should be no longer than 3 minutes. PRACTICE!


1st Post : Title this post the Name of Your Project

Absolutely no more than 9 Slides!

1 Title/Intention Slide. For build projects, describe the Problem and Solution. For conceptual projects this can be expressed as Intention/Solution. The slide should include the name of the project and a one sentence statement of both the problem and the solution.

Example:
Segmented Vehicle
Problem: Design a vehicle for a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse.
Solution:  A segmented vehicle with a universal joint system handles mountainous terrain by conforming to the landscape.
 
1-2  Precedent Slides
  • One slide to show conceptual idea. 
  • One slide to show mechanical or functional idea.
 

1 Concept Sketch. This should be a clean sketch of your initial ideas. If you do not have a nice drawing or lost yours, create one now!

2 Iteration Slides. These slides should show early prototypes of your design. Focus on big changes. You do not need to show tiny changes.

2-3 Final Slides. These should show clean images of your final project (these should be taken in the photo booth).

Text:

The text of your post should have a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What of your project through clear, cogent writing. Tell the story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifest.

The text should include the following 2 items:

  1. A 1-2 sentence project description. 
  2. A 1-2 paragraph brief for your project based on the description below.. The primary purpose of the text is to explain, entice, and convince the reader that your project is amazing and important. Imagine your project on display in the Museum of Modern Art. The text of your post is hanging on the wall next to your work. In 1-2 paragraphs, a viewer should understand what your project is, why it exists, and how you made it. More importantly, the viewer should be interested and care. You will draw them into your project through a compelling narrative.

Things to think about:

  • The what is a clear statement of the thesis or problem+solution.
  • The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – what social issue is it engaging, who is your project helping, how does the project change the world, and what important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise?
  • The how briefly explains what technical prowess, innovative methods, or cool materials you used in your solution.

Here is an example from Penelope the Pain-O-Monster:

Pediatricians and other doctors find it challenging to collect accurate self reported information from children about their level of pain due to lack of communication skills, fear, anxiety, and discomfort. Traditional 1-10 pain scales do not fully address these issues, often leading to uncomfortable children and inaccurate symptom information. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster is a cute plush toy that uses integrated pressure sensors to allow children to express their source and level of pain through play.     

Our previous project, The EmoOwl, helped children with autism to express themselves by translating motion into color. As we sought to expand our children’s health menagerie, we thought about making a different stuffed animal to help kids in hospitals. We quickly realized that the pain charts that patients used to express their pain could be made more interactive and easier for a child to use. We read that playing with stuffed animals can take the children’s mind off the pain so we created an additional “Fun” mode to distraction from pain and anxiety. The handcrafted stuffed animal uses force sensors in different body parts that light up from blue to red depending on how hard they are pushed to show the child’s pain level. It is our hope that Penelope will help sick children feel safer while providing more useful information to care providers. We anticipate that Penelope and the EmOwl will soon have many more friends to help improve healthcare for kids.


2nd Post: Video

Upload a short video showing your project in action. Do not count on your project working as you expect during the presentation.

Steam Washing Machine

Noah Newton-Cheh and Kevin Brown
1 / 21
IMG_5402-202.JPG
Steam-20Washing-20Machine.png
Untitled-20presentation-20(2).png

Kevin:

A washing machine made out of found materials that uses little water and no electricity. 

The Steam Washer is made for people in natural disaster areas or for people living in an area with little water or no electricity. This washing machine will allow people in those areas to clean their clothes without buying a large electrically powered machine. The washing machine consists of two parts, the barrel that you put the clothes in and the heating on the bottom to produce the steam. The barrel of the washing machine is spun with a planetary gear that can be found in a salad spinner. Instead of soaking the clothes in water the washing machine sends steam through the clothes to kill bacteria. The steam condenses on the ceiling of the machine and drips back down into a paint can at the bottom. A propane stove or other heat source can be used to heat the water in the cans to create the steam. The Heating section was made so the user can bend copper piping however they want so that it can accommodate different heat sources. All the user has to do to use the washing machine is heat up a stove and spin a hand crank for a few minutes.


Noah's Brief

The Steam Washer: a machine that provides a cleaning option for people without electricity or with limited clean water. A rectangular stove at the bottom of the washer uses propane to heat up and boil water in a paint can above stove. The boiling water evaporates to create steam that sanitizes clothes in the load space.

1.2 billion people on Earth do not have access to power. The Steam Washer addresses sanitation issues in people without power. Able to operate without electricity and with limited water, The Steam Washer is designed to help support people without electricity. The Steam Washer consists of a propane stove, a metal bucket which needs to be filled with water, and a grated drum which holds the clothes and is spun by the user. The homemade machine helps illustrate to its viewers that useful tools can be created by using scraps.