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  • THE PRESENTATION POST

    This post's privacy is set to Everyone. This post showcases your final design by telling the comprehensive story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested. The arc of the story should encompass the, How of your project in a compelling narrative. It showcases your design process including your brainstorming, each of your iterations, and your final prototype. It allows the viewer to delve deeply into your process.

    • Every Slide should have a Title and Caption.
      The body of this post is The Brief. You should include a version of the Brief for each collaborator in the project.
    • This post will be used in your review presentation at the end of the session.

    You are encouraged to make your narrative as compelling as possible. All of the content below should be included, but if you would like to rearrange the material in order to tell your story differently, work with your coach.


    INTRODUCTION PORTION

    Your presentation is a narrative, and the introduction sets up the scene for that story. Here you introduce the project, say why it is important, and summarize what you did.

    TITLE WITH TAGLINE: This slides shows a crisp, clear final image and the title of your project. with a pithy blurb describing the project. The image, name, and tagline should draw a viewer in. 

    Examples:

    • The Fruit - A line following, light tracking robot
    • Segmented Vehicle - A vehicle that conforms to the landscape
    • Cacoon - Wearable sculpture exploring the concept of transformation and death

    EVOCATIVE  IMAGE: This is a single image that shows a clear image that evokes the soul of your project. This image helps set up the why in a compelling way, sets the stage for your narrative, and will help frame the entire presentation. The caption of this slide (set with the Edit Captions button when editing your post) should discuss the context of your project. No Text on the slide.

    THESIS STATEMENT: This is a TEXT ONLY slide for which briefly describes the Soul and Body of your project. You can use the project description from your Brief or write something new. This statement ties together your narrative.

    Examples:

    • The Cocoon:  A wearable sculpture that explores the concept of transformations and death. The Cocoon explores the spiritual journey beyond the human experience; what it means to be human, how wonder effects us, and the concept of what happens after death.
    • Body Accordion: A musical prosthetic that translates the wearer’s body movements into a dynamic multimedia performance. The Body Accordion converts flex sensor input to sound through Arduino, MaxMSP, and Ableton Live. 

    PROCESS PORTION

    The Process Portion of your presentation tells the story of how you iteratively developed your project. Somewhere in that story you should include conceptual and technical precedents that guided you at each stage as well as brainstorming and process sketches and clear photo booth imagery for 3-4 stages of your process.

    This portion is made up of three types of slides repeated 3-4 times. Each iteration in your process should include:

    • PRECEDENTS:  Precedents are any projects that inspired you creatively or gave you technical guidance. These can include conceptual precedents and technical precedents. No Text.
    • SKETCHES/SKETCH CONCEPT DIAGRAMS: These slides show your generative ideas in sketch form. These should clean, clear drawings. A sketch should show a clear idea. Do not simply scan a messy sketchbook page and expect that people will understand. If you do not have a clear concept or working sketches it is fine to make them after the fact. No Text.
    • PROTOTYPE IMAGES:  These are actual images of the prototypes  you documented in your daily posts. These images illustrate your design decisions and how your project changed at each step. No Text.

    FINAL PORTION

    The Final stage of your presentation is the resolution of your narrative and shows your completed work. The use diagram shows how your project works and the construction diagram shows how it is assembled. Final photos show the project both in action and at rest. The imagery captures your final built design.

    USE DIAGRAM: A diagram showing some aspect of the functionality. These can include:

    • How one uses or interacts with the project
    • The overall behavior of the project over time
    • For a complex interactive project, this can be a clear diagram of the software behavior

    MECHANICAL DIAGRAM:  A diagram offering insight on how the project is put together and functions technically.

    • Ideally, this will be an exploded axonometric
    • At minimum this can be a labeled disassembled photo  

    ELECTRONICS or OTHER DIAGRAM: Additional diagrams showing some important aspect of your design. 

    IMAGERY: The last slides should have an images of the final project. These images should be taken in the photo booth, cropped, and adjusted for contrast, brightness, etc. Images should include:

    • An image of the project in use (taken in the booth or at large). This should include a human interacting with the project.
    • Images of project alone. Include at least one overall image and one detail image.
    • You can also use an image In-Use. 
    • Consider using a GIF to show how the project works. 

     

  • The Brief Part 2 - Full Brief


    Remember, all documents related to the brief are found HERE. These include a note from the writing coach and the Composition Reminder Sheet.

    Now that you have created an document that outlines all of the information you want to relate in the Brief, it is time to weave that information together into a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What and Who of your project through clear, cogent writing. Tell the story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested.

    Create 1 post titled “The Brief” in the Writing tab with text that includes the following 2 items, numbered:

    1. A 1-2 sentence project description for your transcript. This will serve as the basis of the Project Description that appears in your transcript. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. This was Question 1 in your Outline.
      examples:
      Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
      Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
    1. A 1-2 paragraph brief for your project based on the description below. This will be based off the information you put together in your Outline and should focus on style. The NuVu writing coach will give you feedback and you will have the opportunity to revise this text before the final presentation. The primary purpose of The Brief is to explain, entice, and convince the reader that your project is amazing and important. Imagine your project on display in the Museum of Modern Art. The Brief is hanging on the wall next to your work. In 1-2 paragraphs, a viewer should understand what your project is, why it exists, and how you made it, and who it is for. More importantly, the viewer should be interested and care. You will draw them into your project through a compelling narrative.

      Things to think about:
      • Use the information in your Outline. Do not simply put all of the answers together -- you must weave it together into a clear story.
      • The what is a clear statement of the thesis or problem+solution. Your project description for your transcript (#1 above) can be adapted for this purpose.
      • The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – what social issue is it engaging, who is your project helping, how does the project change the world, and what important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? The scope of the why can vary widely.
      • The how briefly explains what technical prowess, innovative methods, or cool materials you used in your solution.
      • The who explains who will use your design, why they will use it, and in what context.
      • Think of the reader - it is good to imagine that a college admissions officer AND a potential employer in the field of your design should both be able to understand and be excited by the project based on your writing.

    Write in the Third person in an explanatory fashion. Resist using I, WE, OUR, or YOU and focus on describing the work.

    Here is an example from Penelope the Pain-O-Monster:

    Pediatricians and other doctors find it challenging to collect accurate self reported information from children about their level of pain due to lack of communication skills, fear, anxiety, and discomfort. Traditional 1-10 pain scales do not fully address these issues, often leading to uncomfortable children and inaccurate symptom information. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster is a cute plush toy that uses integrated pressure sensors to allow children to express their source and level of pain through play.

    A previous project, The EmoOwl, helped children with autism to express themselves by translating motion into color. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster grew out of the desire to expand children’s health menagerie with a different stuffed animal, one that makes the pain charts patients use to express their pain more interactive and easier for a child to use. Because research has shown that playing with stuffed animals can take children’s mind off pain, an additional “Fun” mode was added to distract from pain and anxiety. The handcrafted stuffed animal uses force sensors in different body parts that light up from blue to red depending on how hard they are pushed to show the child’s pain level. The hope is that, as one of many future healthcare friends, Penelope can help sick children feel safer while providing more useful information to care providers.

  • Fashion has always been a strong form of expression, and it is a tool people often use to show off their personality. This studio is meant to take this concept even further. With modern technology, fashion has become even more of a way to put ideas into the world in unconventional forms. There is an opposite side to this also, which is the idea of fashion reflecting what is happening around it, instead of behind it. Our goal for this project was to make an outfit that somehow responds to the environment around it. This, in addition to using and learning about design, electronics, and programming, is the main problem this studio is based around and trying to solve. 

    Our group decided to take on this challenge by creating a garment that responded to audio. The concept of sound was intriguing to us, especially because we also liked the design aspect of actual soundwaves. Sound is ubiquitous, and it impacts many elements in it’s environment. We went with this idea and designed a dress with a soundwave pattern on the skirt that lights up from underneath according to how loud the room is. With proper programming, it is possible to make LED lights react to the volume or frequency around them.

    We started making the dress by brainstorming first. We came up with ideas on what we wanted our design to accomplish and the physical appearance of it. After we had a solid idea for our project, we then moved on to prototyping. Prototyping consisted of a lot of trial and error in creating our final piece which helped us to make the best finishing product as possible. We went to goodwill to get fabric to practice our techniques on to test them out to make sure we knew what would work and what could be improved by using different things.

    As a result of our prototype, we discovered the most effective and best ways to make our dress. For example, we had an issue with fraying on our skirt. The prototype gave us the opportunity to test out different strategies and methods to keep the fraying at a minimum. We started by making patterns, then sewing, and then putting all of the pieces together while adding the finishing touches.
    In conclusion, this studio was very enjoyable and interesting. We learned a lot about the fashion industry and how difficult it is to make an exceptional dress on a time limit.

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