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  • Portfolio Day

    After the Final Presentation, you have the opportunity to consider your presentation in light of final feedback and discussion. You will spend additional time reviewing you presentations, refining you portfolio, and polishing you work before it is made public on the internet.

    The Self Evaluation is an opportunity for you to reflect on your work during the Studio. Students and Coaches receive the same prompts and categories, and the students will evaluate their own progress and skill levels in Design Skills and Subject Skills applicable to the studio both numerically and textually. Through a narrative, you will also reflect on the quality and rigor of your work, give feedback on the studio, and have the opportunity to receive similar feedback directly from the coach.

  • https://theconstructor.org/building/properties-of-building-materials-construction/14891/

    https://www.srmbsteel.com/content/5-essential-building-materials




    Brief

    The objective of the project is to convey the ranging strengths of raw building materials in form of chess pieces (higher status pieces will tend to be stronger. The physical project is a set of six chess pieces, each with a different material. All materials are made out of themselves, or emulated through other materials. Each different material stands on its own pedestal. The pieces are made out of the material they are to represent the unspoken hierarchy of building materials on a hardness scale. One idea was to unify the look of the set was to make all the materials look natural and unaltered while asymmetrical. Another idea was to use a shared focal point, and put a concrete foundation under each on of them. The relationship between pieces is shown through this as well as an untouched feeling. There are no question that the pieces are simple and convey the message of different material strengths, but one might ask why the king is made of glass: it's because the piece is unique and fragile compared to its others, alike glass to the other materials. To make the pieces, various methods of casting were used, as well as clay work and carving. The player should experience a unique game of chess because of the unorthodox pieces; the touch of each piece, the temperature, even sounds. 

    I wanted hierarchy to play a big part and be physical, as well as the identities of the pieces. I used the practice drawings (emotion) to assign the shapes to each piece, based on how it made me feel and its own personality. This projects will probably influence my future projects because now I have a feeling that I can recognize/create an aesthetic identity.

  •  Siena Brief:

    Marine Ecosystem is a chess set that shows the intelligence of marine life animals, and portrays them in the ocean. The project is intended to educate people about intelligent marine life. In this, every piece is a different marine animal (ranked 1 to 6) from most intelligent animals, like a dolphin being king, to the pawn being a clownfish. 

    This chess set is created with blue liquid mixed with resin to make each piece appear as if it's in the ocean. The ranking system symbolizes how each animal connects with a intelligent trait, for example the sea lion piece shows it balancing a ball on its nose, highlighting its' ability to learn. The set exists to allow a simple chess game to teach people about marine life. This project is created for people who are interested in learning more about marine life. We chose a dolphin to be the king, a octopus to be the queen, a killer whale to be the bishop, a sea lion to be the knight a great white shark to be the rook and a clownfish is a pawn.

    Kevin's Brief:

    This chess set, A Hierarchy of Intelligent marine animals, represents the different chess pieces based on their level of intelligence. The pieces are made of clay and posed to show one quality that they show through their poses.

    The Marine Intelligence chess set has a hierarchy like any other chess set: the pieces are defined by the intelligence each marine animal. Each animal is made of clay and encased in blue resin. The resin looks like water surrounding the animals and gives off floating in the ocean effect. There are six different pieces in the chess set. The king is represented by the smartest marine animal, the dolphin. The queen is an octopus, the bishop is a killer whale, the knights are sea lions, and the rooks are great white sharks. The pawns are just an assortment of colorful fish, crabs, and seahorses.

     

  • This game of chess represents gentrification with the chess pieces symbolizing the difference between the local restaurants and the chain restaurants.

    The chain-restaurant pieces are more rigid and plain whereas the local restaurant pieces are more diverse and unique. The project exists for players to better understand the problems with chain businesses coming in and driving local businesses out. The project teaches chess players the impact of gentrification with the two sides playing against each other. The rules would be the same as in traditional chess, however, the pieces look different. We used wood and cement to create the chess pieces, 

  • Janice:

    Why don't cashiers have a chair? We read reviews of previous Walmart employees on their experience in different job positions, and discovered that there is usually a large imbalance between the staff and management. Those in hourly-paid jobs reported less opportunity for pay, benefits, advancement in the company, and overall respect. Employees with a salary acknowledged existing negligence, although they lacked discernible remorse or empathy.

    We attempt to portray this inequality with a chess set that represents Walmart's hierarchy. Pawns have little resemblance to the Walmart logo, yet as pieces increase in importance (like the queen and king), they grow closer in resemblance to the Walmart logo. This represents the divide between corporate Walmart employees and hourly workers.  This is an observation that Walmart adopts those in corporate positions, and distances themselves from employees on the lower rungs of the task force, even when subsidiaries may stay with the company for longer. We also accentuated the stark disparity further with a jump in the geometry of the head of the pieces when the management jobs are introduced as the kings and queens. The mechanics of chess help to drive our point further by giving the lower-ranking pieces a shorter range of movement, comparable to the absence of options for advancement in an worker's career at Walmart. Overall, this chess set aims to call out Walmart on the similarities in their employee dynamics to the piece mechanics of chess, a game modeled after a tyrannical monarchy.


    Uliana:

    This chess game, "Pros: Paycheck Cons: Everything" uses chess pieces to mimic the hierarchy of Walmart and other retail jobs.  We wanted to show that employees lower in the corporate hierarchy are controlled by management and executives who only care about money.  Our six pieces represent maintenance workers (pawn), cashiers (rook), stockers (knight), sales associates (bishop), department managers (queen), and store managers (king). 

    We chose to represent the progression of power and lack of empathy in each of these roles by making the pieces look progressively more like a Walmart symbol until the king is explicitly the Walmart symbol. This exemplifies how employees that are higher up in the Walmart hierarchy care more about the benefits and money that Walmart gives them rather than the employees below them.

  • Lucy Brief:  Social Chess is a game that uses patterns that highlights different types of privilege in the real world to help show the flaws in our society. Each piece is made out of concrete to have a simplistic look. This game uses pawns with different abilities to show how being born in a certain social class may affect how you move up in life.

    Society has created a system where people with more privilege tend to move up while people with less tend to stay the same or fall behind. This game is made to show the different advantages and disadvantages that people face depending on their social status. The game uses 15 pawns and one king on each side of the board. The goal is to get the pawns to the other side also representing the idea of the "American dream".  Even though they are all pawns, some pieces have advantages that help them get to the other side faster. Once a pawn gets to the other side they can turn into any piece they want except for a pawn with an advantage. They turn into their advantage. For example, the rook pawn will then unlock all the powers a rook has but it can't change into anything else. This is to show that some advantages don't actually help in the end.

    Sina Brief: 

    A version of chess that represents the flaws of the modern "American Dream" through the journey of a pawn to the other side of the board. It portrays the different experiences of those in different social classes with pawns who are given different abilities and moves than others. 


    The “American Dream” is the idea that everybody can achieve their dreams of success as long as they work hard. Social Chess makes the player question whether the “American Dream” is the same today. In chess, bringing your pawn to the other side of the board allows it to transform into a better piece. Social Chess takes that move and uses it to represent the modern American life: every piece except for the king is a pawn who wants to achieve their dreams by getting to the other side, but some pieces start with the enhanced physical traits and movement abilities of other pieces which gives them with a major advantage. The pawns are made of the same concrete mold to show the original intention of equality and uniformity, but certain pieces have obvious differences from that blueprint -- they have physical traits of better pieces. Despite their intention of uniformity, there is a big contrast between the advantaged and disadvantaged pieces. This demonstrates to the player the impact social class has on the ability to find success and achieve the American Dream. 

  • Please upload your completed Outline + Draft Brief  by Friday morning


    The Brief - Part 1 - Outline

    As part of your portfolio for each studio, you will be asked to write a Brief for your project. The Brief is a written piece that will accompany your presentation and is a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What of your project through clear, cogent writing. It tells the story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested.

    ------Copy & Paste this section below into a new post and answer ALL of the questions completely ---- 

    The Brief Part 1 - Outline

    Answer the following questions in full, complete sentences. Title the post "Brief Outline" and post it in the Writing Tab of your Project. Every student must do this assignment. Cut and paste the assignment below and write your answers below each point. You must respond to ALL items (#4 can be skipped if there is no individual client). Click Shift-Return to start a new line.

    1. Write a A 1-2 sentence project description. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. 
      1. What is the "soul" of your project? Describe the idea of the project in conceptual terms. This should paint a conceptual picture in the readers mind. (1 sentences)
      2. What is the "body" of your project? Describe the basic technical or physical construction of the project. This should NOT go into excessive detail, just provide an overview. Describe the project to someone with no technical knowledge in as few words as possible. The reader should be able to envision what the project looks like. ( sentences)

        Examples:
        Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
        Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
    2. Why does your project exist? The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – 
      1. What social issue does your project engage? (1 sentence)
      2. Who is your project helping?  (1 sentence)
      3. How does the project change the world? This can be in a simple physical way or in a complex social way. (1 sentence)
      4. What important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? (1 sentence)
    3. Who is the project for? Who will use it and in what context (1 sentence)
    4.   If you are designing for a specific person, answer the following:
      1. What is the client's name and what is their medical condition, if any? (1 sentence)
      2. How does their condition relate to your project? Include concise and compelling information about the client you are working with, their condition, and how that relates to your project design. (1 sentence)
      3. What is their personality like and how does it inform your design process? (1 sentence)
    5. How does your project work. In non-jargonistic language, answer the following 
      1. What is the basic technology behind your project? (1 sentence)
      2. What is technically innovative about your project? How does it differ from existing technology? (1 sentence)
      3. How does a user physically and mentally interact with the project? (1-2 sentences)


    Now that you have created a document that outlines all of the information you want to relate in the Brief, it is time to weave that information together into a strong narrative that ties together the Why, How and What and Who of your project through clear, cogent writing. Tell the story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested.

    Create 1 post titled “The Brief” in the Writing tab with text that includes the following 2 items, numbered:

    1. A 1-2 sentence project description for your transcript. This will serve as the basis of the Project Description that appears in your transcript. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. This was Question 1 in your Outline.
      examples:
      Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
      Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
    2. A 1-2 paragraph brief for your project based on the description below. This will be based off the information you put together in your Outline and should focus on style. The NuVu writing coach will give you feedback and you will have the opportunity to revise this text before the final presentation. The primary purpose of The Brief is to explain, entice, and convince the reader that your project is amazing and important. Imagine your project on display in the Museum of Modern Art. The Brief is hanging on the wall next to your work. In 1-2 paragraphs, a viewer should understand what your project is, why it exists, and howyou made it, and who it is for. More importantly, the viewer should be interested and care. You will draw them into your project through a compelling narrative.

      Things to think about:
      • Use the information in your Outline. Do not simply put all of the answers together -- you must weave it together into a clear story.
      • The what is a clear statement of the thesis or problem+solution. Your project description for your transcript (#1 above) can be adapted for this purpose.
      • The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – what social issue is it engaging, who is your project helping, how does the project change the world, and what important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? The scope of the why can vary widely.
      • The how briefly explains what technical prowess, innovative methods, or cool materials you used in your solution.
      • The who explains who will use your design, why they will use it, and in what context.
      • Think of the reader - it is good to imagine that a college admissions officer AND a potential employer in the field of your design should both be able to understand and be excited by the project based on your writing.

    Write in the Third person in an explanatory fashion. Resist using I, WE, OUR, or YOU and focus on describing the work.

    Here is an example from Penelope the Pain-O-Monster:

    Pediatricians and other doctors find it challenging to collect accurate self reported information from children about their level of pain due to lack of communication skills, fear, anxiety, and discomfort. Traditional 1-10 pain scales do not fully address these issues, often leading to uncomfortable children and inaccurate symptom information. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster is a cute plush toy that uses integrated pressure sensors to allow children to express their source and level of pain through play.

    A previous project, The EmoOwl, helped children with autism to express themselves by translating motion into color. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster grew out of the desire to expand children’s health menagerie with a different stuffed animal, one that makes the pain charts patients use to express their pain more interactive and easier for a child to use. Because research has shown that playing with stuffed animals can take children’s mind off pain, an additional “Fun” mode was added to distract from pain and anxiety. The handcrafted stuffed animal uses force sensors in different body parts that light up from blue to red depending on how hard they are pushed to show the child’s pain level. The hope is that, as one of many future healthcare friends, Penelope can help sick children feel safer while providing more useful information to care providers.

  • The Brief Part 2 - Full Brief v2


    This is Due Tuesday morning


    Remember, all documents related to the brief are found HERE. These include a note from the writing coach and the Composition Reminder Sheet.

    Create 1 post titled “The Brief v2” in the Writing tab.  The text should include the items below and should take into consideration the edits given to you on your draft v1 from the writing coaches.

    1. A 1-2 sentence project description for your transcript. This will serve as the basis of the Project Description that appears in your transcript. This description should not include the name of the project and should be written in the third person. This was Question 1 in your Outline.
      examples:
      Night Light Blankie: A child's sensory blanket that provides comfort and privacy in the high stress environment of the hospital using weight, textures, and light. The blanket transforms into a mini light up fort over a child’s head.
      Cocoon: a shroud that explores human spirituality and the concept of life after death through the use of repetitive religious iconography. Composed of over 300 pieces of laser cut balsa wood lined with space tape, the icons are arranged using a mathematical strange attractor.
    1. A 1-2 paragraph brief for your project based on the description below. This will be based off the information you put together in your Outline and should focus on style. The NuVu writing coach will give you feedback and you will have the opportunity to revise this text before the final presentation. The primary purpose of The Brief is to explain, entice, and convince the reader that your project is amazing and important. Imagine your project on display in the Museum of Modern Art. The Brief is hanging on the wall next to your work. In 1-2 paragraphs, a viewer should understand what your project is, why it exists, and how you made it, and who it is for. More importantly, the viewer should be interested and care. You will draw them into your project through a compelling narrative.

      Things to think about:
      • Use the information in your Outline. Do not simply put all of the answers together -- you must weave it together into a clear story.
      • The what is a clear statement of the thesis or problem+solution. Your project description for your transcript (#1 above) can be adapted for this purpose.
      • The why explains how your project changes the world. It is the reason your project exists – what social issue is it engaging, who is your project helping, how does the project change the world, and what important social, intellectual, or technical questions does it raise? The scope of the why can vary widely.
      • The how briefly explains what technical prowess, innovative methods, or cool materials you used in your solution.
      • The who explains who will use your design, why they will use it, and in what context.
      • Think of the reader - it is good to imagine that a college admissions officer AND a potential employer in the field of your design should both be able to understand and be excited by the project based on your writing.

    Write in the Third person in an explanatory fashion. Resist using I, WE, OUR, or YOU and focus on describing the work.

    Here is an example from Penelope the Pain-O-Monster:

    Pediatricians and other doctors find it challenging to collect accurate self reported information from children about their level of pain due to lack of communication skills, fear, anxiety, and discomfort. Traditional 1-10 pain scales do not fully address these issues, often leading to uncomfortable children and inaccurate symptom information. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster is a cute plush toy that uses integrated pressure sensors to allow children to express their source and level of pain through play.

    A previous project, The EmoOwl, helped children with autism to express themselves by translating motion into color. Penelope the Pain-O-Monster grew out of the desire to expand children’s health menagerie with a different stuffed animal, one that makes the pain charts patients use to express their pain more interactive and easier for a child to use. Because research has shown that playing with stuffed animals can take children’s mind off pain, an additional “Fun” mode was added to distract from pain and anxiety. The handcrafted stuffed animal uses force sensors in different body parts that light up from blue to red depending on how hard they are pushed to show the child’s pain level. The hope is that, as one of many future healthcare friends, Penelope can help sick children feel safer while providing more useful information to care providers.

  • Your portfolio tab is the part of your project viewable to the world. This is where you will present your work to your coaches and peers for your studio review presentation. This is also what family, friends, colleges, the media, and everyone outside of NuVu will see. It is the record of your work and must stand alone, telling a compelling story of your project.

    Portfolio pages have 2-3 posts in this order:

    1. The Presentation Post: This post's privacy is set to Everyone. This post showcases your final design by telling the comprehensive story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested. The arc of the story should encompass the, How of your project in a compelling narrative. It showcases your design process including your brainstorming, each of your iterations, and your final prototype. It allows the viewer to delve deeply into your process.
      • Every Slide should have a Title and Caption.
        The body of this post is The Brief. You should include a version of the Brief for each collaborator in the project.
      • This post will be used in your review presentation at the end of the session.
    2. Optional Video: This post's privacy is set to Everyone. A video showing the interactive functionality of your project. The title of this post will be Video.
    3. Presentation Script: This post's privacy is set to School. Each group will post their script for there presentation. This post will be used to prepare for and practice your presentation. This post should be titled "Presentation Script" and should not be made public. Alternatively, 

     

    After reading this post and completing your Portfolio Tab, you must make sure you have done the following:

  • THE PRESENTATION POST

    This post's privacy is set to Everyone. This post showcases your final design by telling the comprehensive story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested. The arc of the story should encompass the, How of your project in a compelling narrative. It showcases your design process including your brainstorming, each of your iterations, and your final prototype. It allows the viewer to delve deeply into your process.

    • Every Slide should have a Title and Caption.
      The body of this post is The Brief. You should include a version of the Brief for each collaborator in the project.
    • This post will be used in your review presentation at the end of the session.

    You are encouraged to make your narrative as compelling as possible. All of the content below should be included, but if you would like to rearrange the material in order to tell your story differently, work with your coach.


    INTRODUCTION PORTION

    Your presentation is a narrative, and the introduction sets up the scene for that story. Here you introduce the project, say why it is important, and summarize what you did.

    TITLE WITH TAGLINE: This slides shows a crisp, clear final image and the title of your project. with a pithy blurb describing the project. The image, name, and tagline should draw a viewer in. 

    Examples:

    • The Fruit - A line following, light tracking robot
    • Segmented Vehicle - A vehicle that conforms to the landscape
    • Cacoon - Wearable sculpture exploring the concept of transformation and death

    EVOCATIVE  IMAGE: This is a single image that shows a clear image that evokes the soul of your project. This image helps set up the why in a compelling way, sets the stage for your narrative, and will help frame the entire presentation. The caption of this slide (set with the Edit Captions button when editing your post) should discuss the context of your project. No Text on the slide.

    THESIS STATEMENT: This is a TEXT ONLY slide for which briefly describes the Soul and Body of your project. You can use the project description from your Brief or write something new. This statement ties together your narrative.

    Examples:

    • The Cocoon:  A wearable sculpture that explores the concept of transformations and death. The Cocoon explores the spiritual journey beyond the human experience; what it means to be human, how wonder effects us, and the concept of what happens after death.
    • Body Accordion: A musical prosthetic that translates the wearer’s body movements into a dynamic multimedia performance. The Body Accordion converts flex sensor input to sound through Arduino, MaxMSP, and Ableton Live. 
    • Seed to Soup Animation: A whimsical animation about the slow food movement. Seed to Soup showcases a holistic method of cooking. From garden, to kitchen, to dinner table.
    • Antlers: A wearable sculpture inspired by antlers found in the deer and antelope family. "Antlers" explores the comparison between armor and attraction. 

    PROCESS PORTION

    The Process Portion of your presentation tells the story of how you iteratively developed your project. Somewhere in that story you should include conceptual and technical precedents that guided you at each stage as well as brainstorming and process sketches and clear photo booth imagery for 3-4 stages of your process.

    This portion is made up of three types of slides repeated 3-4 times. Each iteration in your process should include:

    • PRECEDENTS:  Precedents are any projects that inspired you creatively or gave you technical guidance. These can include conceptual precedents and technical precedents. No Text.
    • SKETCHES/SKETCH CONCEPT DIAGRAMS: These slides show your generative ideas in sketch form. These should clean, clear drawings. A sketch should show a clear idea. Do not simply scan a messy sketchbook page and expect that people will understand. If you do not have a clear concept or working sketches it is fine to make them after the fact. No Text.
    • PROTOTYPE IMAGES:  These are actual images of the prototypes  you documented in your daily posts. These images illustrate your design decisions and how your project changed at each step. No Text.

    FINAL PORTION

    The Final stage of your presentation is the resolution of your narrative and shows your completed work. The use diagram shows how your project works and the construction diagram shows how it is assembled. Final photos show the project both in action and at rest. The imagery captures your final built design.

    USE DIAGRAM: A diagram showing some aspect of the functionality. These can include:

    • How one uses or interacts with the project
    • The overall behavior of the project over time
    • For a complex interactive project, this can be a clear diagram of the software behavior

    MECHANICAL DIAGRAM:  A diagram offering insight on how the project is put together and functions technically.

    • Ideally, this will be an exploded axonometric
    • At minimum this can be a labeled disassembled photo  

    ELECTRONICS or OTHER DIAGRAM: Additional diagrams showing some important aspect of your design. 

    IMAGERY: The last slides should have an images of the final project. These images should be taken in the photo booth, cropped, and adjusted for contrast, brightness, etc. Images should include:

    • An image of the project in use (taken in the booth or at large). This should include a human interacting with the project.
    • Images of project alone. Include at least one overall image and one detail image.
    • You can also use an image In-Use. 
    • Consider using a GIF to show how the project works. 

     

  • next

  • Design is everywhere. We observe and encounter design during every moment of our daily lives: the objects we interact with, the spaces where we live, work, and play, the landscapes that surround us, the transportation systems that help us move, the communication systems we use, the streets and cities we navigate... Each human-made artifact tells a unique story of why and how it was created. Design is deeply woven into the history of humankind.

    The act of designing physical objects and structures to solve specific challenges and as an expression of culture has existed throughout human history. Early humans carved stone tools for hunting and eating, the Mayan civilization wove thatch roofs to protect from rain, the Romans constructed aqueducts to transport water across cities, the Shang dynasty’s cast ritual bronzes for making tools, the Gandhara’s carved the Bamiyan Buddhas as an expression of spirituality, the Anastasi carving a city beneath a cliff to protect from sun. No matter when something was designed, what was made, or who made it, each was created for a specific purpose.

    Design is....?

    In this studio, we will explore methods and techniques for designing, design analysis, and design theory. Throughout the studio, we will address three key questions through a series of exercises, presentations, readings, and discussions:

    • What is design?
    • How do we design?
    • How does design shape our world?

  • Portfolio Day

    After the Final Presentation, you have the opportunity to consider your presentation in light of final feedback and discussion. You will spend additional time reviewing you presentations, refining you portfolio, and polishing you work before it is made public on the internet.

    The Self Evaluation is an opportunity for you to reflect on your work during the Studio. Students and Coaches receive the same prompts and categories, and the students will evaluate their own progress and skill levels in Design Skills and Subject Skills applicable to the studio both numerically and textually. Through a narrative, you will also reflect on the quality and rigor of your work, give feedback on the studio, and have the opportunity to receive similar feedback directly from the coach.