Brink: Biometric Interface [Master]

  • Introduction

    My design prompt was to design something for sled dogs that would warn their owners about when their dogs were going to get hypothermia or die from exhaustion during races. My solution to the problem of owners not knowing about their dogs’ health was to make a dog coat with sensors to warn owners about their dogs’ problems.

     

    Product

    There is only one iteration of my product, and almost everything works well. The sensors that I included in the jacket both do what they are meant to do. The temperature sensor senses when the body temperature is too low, and the LED strips on the jacket light up to show that. The EMG also senses what it has to, and the LEDs light up blue to show slow muscle contractions. The ear clip that hold the temperature sensor to the dog’s ear is sturdy and will not fall apart anytime soon. Because dogs have fur, I could not find a way to make my own heart rate monitor, but there is one already, called the Voyce. The Whole circuit fits on the coat, but the coat does not look as good as I would have liked. Since I do not have a design team, I used a store bought coat which did not allow me to put the electronics inside of the coat so I had to put everything on top of the jacket. If I had more time and also a design team, I would create a coat to put the circuit in, and I would also find a way to measure the dog’s heart rate using a collar.

     

    Conclusion

    The dog coat works by measuring the body temperature and the time it takes for the dogs muscles to contract. If the dog’s body temperature is below 95 degrees Fahrenheit, the LED strip on the coat lights up red. If the dog’s muscle contractions are too slow, it can be a sign of exhaustion. If the muscle contractions take a long time, then the LEDs glow blue. If both sensors detect problems in the dog, the LED strip lights up purple. When the dog’s owner sees the coat lighting up a specific color, they know what problem has been detected and can either give the dogs a break, or warm them up.

     

    Final Post

    The Iditarod is a 1,000 mile dog sled race across Alaska during which the sled dog racers must go through mountain ranges, frozen rivers, tundra, and blizzards in temperatures below zero degrees Fahrenheit. During these races, the dogs that pull the racers’ sleds can get hurt or even die without the racers knowing what is happening to them. Sled dogs can get hypothermia because their owners do not know how cold the dogs are, and they can also die of exhaustion since they must pull their owners, a sled, and survival gear in such frigid conditions. I have designed a coat for the sled dogs that can warn their owners about the beginnings of hypothermia, and also tell them when the dog needs a rest. The main signs of early hypothermia are a slow pulse and a body temperature below 95 degrees, while the sign of exhaustion is slowed muscle contractions. Because of these signs, my dog coat has a temperature sensor that goes in the ear, attached by a clip and an Electromyography sensor (EMG) that goes on the front right leg of the dog. Because dogs have fur I was unable to find a way to measure the heartbeat, but there is a new dog collar that measures heartbeat using a patented technology which utilizes low frequency radio waves. The sensors are connected to an Arduino that has an LED light strip attached to it on the outside of the coat. If the dog’s body temperature drops to below 95 degrees, the light strip glows red, and if the muscle contractions become very slow, the lights glow blue. In the case that both the temperature and muscle contraction times are at a dangerous level, the light strip glows purple. If I had a working heart rate monitor, I would have made the lights glow green for a slow pulse, yellow for both slow pulse and low body temperature, turquoise for slow muscle contractions, and white for if all three of the sensors detected problems.

  • The Iditarod is a 1,000 mile dog sled race across Alaska during which the sled dog racers must go through mountain ranges, frozen rivers, tundra, and blizzards in temperatures below zero degrees Fahrenheit. During these races, the dogs that pull the racers’ sleds can get hurt or even die without the racers knowing what is happening to them. Sled dogs can get hypothermia because their owners do not know how cold the dogs are, and they can also die of exhaustion since they must pull their owners, a sled, and survival gear in such frigid conditions. I have designed a coat for the sled dogs that can warn their owners about the beginnings of hypothermia, and also tell them when the dog needs a rest. The main signs of early hypothermia are a slow pulse and a body temperature below 95 degrees, while the sign of exhaustion is slowed muscle contractions. Because of these signs, my dog coat has a temperature sensor that goes in the ear, attached by a clip and an Electromyography sensor (EMG) that goes on the front right leg of the dog. Because dogs have fur I was unable to find a way to measure the heartbeat, but there is a new dog collar that measures heartbeat using a patented technology which utilizes low frequency radio waves. The sensors are connected to an Arduino that has an LED light strip attached to it on the outside of the coat. If the dog’s body temperature drops to below 95 degrees, the light strip glows red, and if the muscle contractions become very slow, the lights glow blue. In the case that both the temperature and muscle contraction times are at a dangerous level, the light strip glows purple. If I had a working heart rate monitor, I would have made the lights glow green for a slow pulse, yellow for both slow pulse and low body temperature, turquoise for slow muscle contractions, and white for if all three of the sensors detected problems.

  • Many people have careers that place them on the brink of life and death. While there are many technologies out there to help people who are placed in those situations, there are still many advancements that need to be made. For the brainstorming process, we brainstormed many different scenarios and careers that place people on the brink of life. Among these careers are deep sea divers, firefighters, high altitude mountaineers, and back-country skiers. People who take part in these activities experience hypothermia, low oxygen levels, and frostbite, among other issues. While doing research on hypothermia we found that one of the first things that doctors do to treat hypothermia is give them a heated IV. This heated IV allows the patient to raise their body temperature, easing them out of hypothermia. Our group thought that creating a portable heated IV would be great for people who are experiencing hypothermia while high altitude climbing, and once treated with this IV, they will be healthy enough to summit the mountain to seek medical help.

    Originally, we were going to have IV bags that people would carry in their packs. After thinking about that for awhile, we realized that carrying an IV bag would add a bunch of extra weight to a backpack. Most high altitude climbers use Nalgenes, so we decided to use the water from our Nalgene for the IV. The water in the Nalgene will be purified by UV lights. Additionally, in the compartment there will be a salt tab that will mix with the water to create the saline solution that is normally found in an IV bag.

    The first iteration of the portable heated IV screwed onto the top of the water bottle. This cap was comprised of 6 holes for the UV lights, with a hole in the middle for the IV. We liked the shape of the compartment, and it screwed on and off of the Nalgene cap easily, so we continued off that idea for our next iteration. However, the piece wasn’t long enough, so we decided to lengthen it. We knew before creating the piece that it would not hold the cuff and the necessary technology involved in our piece, but we created it to test the shape and idea.

    In our second iteration, we redesigned the cylinder so that it actually had two compartments that would screw together. Though there were two compartments, there would be a small piece in between the two that would screw them together, so that they remained the same diameter and size. We designed the piece to fit exactly between the two compartments so that it wouldn’t be visible when the entire piece was together. The part had triangular shaped spaces cutting through it where the IV tube and wires for the technology side of our studio fit. In the upper cylinder, the holes remained for the UV lights, but there was more space underneath for the Arduino. In the bottom compartment, we created a hole in the middle designed to fit the IV reservoir and tubing, and small spaces directly next to the reservoir where the resistors to warm the reservoir sat. This spacing for the pieces worked well, except that the entire reservoir piece took up too much room, so much that all of the compartments didn’t screw together. Underneath the inner part designed to hold the reservoir and resistors, there was room underneath to hold the arm cuff and the excess tubing. We also designed two caps to close together the whole piece. Except for the fact that it was a bit sharp and there some minor fitting issues, the caps worked well and made the entire piece compact and portable. For the next iteration, which was the final one, we made a few critical changes.

        The next iteration was the design of the arm cuff. The purpose of the arm cuff is to hold and stabilize the needle, making it easier to slide and secure in the user’s arm. However, the cuff couldn’t be too big, because otherwise it wouldn’t fit in our bottom compartment, defeating the purpose of keeping all the pieces in one place. On Fusion, we created the piece so that it rounded to sit on the user’s forearm comfortably. There were two cutouts on the ends to connect with the Velcro strapping that would allow for adjustability and security. The top of the cuff had a track allowing the needle holder to run back and forth. The needle holder was just a semi circle piece, with the length across being the diameter of the needle holder on the tubing, so that the needle holder would just pop into place on the cuff. There were a few issues with the piece, though. The two cutouts on the ends were thin, so they weren’t strong enough to hold the strapping - one of the pieces actually broke. Another problem was the semi circle needle holder on the cuff didn’t hold the actual casing around the needle, so it fit it but didn’t keep it in place. Also, the body of the cuff wasn’t long enough to fit comfortably. For our final iteration, we had to change these issues.

    The final iteration of the container is pretty similar to the previous, we only changed a few things. The major change that we made was to the canister. We moved the IV holder to the side so that the tube and electronics can go out the side instead of through the middle. The second compartment that we added was for the battery pack. Adding this battery pack allows us to use a bigger battery, and still fit everything within the container. The final thing that we made space for in the container is the cuff. Secondly, we reprinted the connector screw. While keeping the hole consistent throughout, we made the reel slits only halfway through. We kept the slits so that we can twist the screw, but we made part of it solid so that the user can not see the arduino and chords while in use.

     

    Biometrics Process

    This process began by deciding what sensors and devices we wanted to use in order to perform the most beneficial functions to the portable IV.  The first and most obvious function was a heating device due to the extremely cold temperatures on mountains that the user would be hiking in.  This heating device would be used to heat the IV to the optimal heat between 104 and 106 degrees Fahrenheit.  The idea of this heating device is that is using the heat that resistors generate in order to heat the IV drip to the optimal temperature.  This process began by simply hooking a 3.9 ohm resistor up to the Arduino and attaching the resistor up to the temperature sensor in order to read the heat that the resistor was giving off.  Initially there was not enough power to make the resistor heat up to the optimal heat.  Many alterations were then made over a span of three days.  The result was four resistors saudered in series hooked up to an 11 volt lithium polymer battery. This battery provided the correct amount of power in order to heat the resistors up to the correct temperature.  The four resistors could now be wrapped around the temperature sensor in order to insulate the increased heat.  This allowed for the temperature to increase faster.  The arduino was then programmed to cool down if the temperature exceeded 106 degrees and heat up if the temperature fell below 102 degrees the resistors would heat up again.  After this was successfully programmed the sketch was uploaded to an Arduino Micro, and the necessary wires were saudered into a perf board in order to minimize the size of the device in order for the device to fit into the piece.  After this was done, UV lights were attached in series and saudered together in order to fit into the holes in which they are meant to be placed within the piece.  However, the lights should have been attached in parallel rather than in series.  This issue was fixed and the lights worked.

     

  • Introduction

    My design prompt was to design something for sled dogs that would warn their owners about when their dogs were going to get hypothermia or die from exhaustion during races. My solution to the problem of owners not knowing about their dogs’ health was to make a dog coat with sensors to warn owners about their dogs’ problems.

     

    Product

    There is only one iteration of my product, and almost everything works well. The sensors that I included in the jacket both do what they are meant to do. The temperature sensor senses when the body temperature is too low, and the LED strips on the jacket light up to show that. The EMG also senses what it has to, and the LEDs light up blue to show slow muscle contractions. The ear clip that hold the temperature sensor to the dog’s ear is sturdy and will not fall apart anytime soon. Because dogs have fur, I could not find a way to make my own heart rate monitor, but there is one already, called the Voyce. The Whole circuit fits on the coat, but the coat does not look as good as I would have liked. Since I do not have a design team, I used a store bought coat which did not allow me to put the electronics inside of the coat so I had to put everything on top of the jacket. If I had more time and also a design team, I would create a coat to put the circuit in, and I would also find a way to measure the dog’s heart rate using a collar.

     

    Conclusion

    The dog coat works by measuring the body temperature and the time it takes for the dogs muscles to contract. If the dog’s body temperature is below 95 degrees Fahrenheit, the LED strip on the coat lights up red. If the dog’s muscle contractions are too slow, it can be a sign of exhaustion. If the muscle contractions take a long time, then the LEDs glow blue. If both sensors detect problems in the dog, the LED strip lights up purple. When the dog’s owner sees the coat lighting up a specific color, they know what problem has been detected and can either give the dogs a break, or warm them up.

     

    Final Post

    The Iditarod is a 1,000 mile dog sled race across Alaska during which the sled dog racers must go through mountain ranges, frozen rivers, tundra, and blizzards in temperatures below zero degrees Fahrenheit. During these races, the dogs that pull the racers’ sleds can get hurt or even die without the racers knowing what is happening to them. Sled dogs can get hypothermia because their owners do not know how cold the dogs are, and they can also die of exhaustion since they must pull their owners, a sled, and survival gear in such frigid conditions. I have designed a coat for the sled dogs that can warn their owners about the beginnings of hypothermia, and also tell them when the dog needs a rest. The main signs of early hypothermia are a slow pulse and a body temperature below 95 degrees, while the sign of exhaustion is slowed muscle contractions. Because of these signs, my dog coat has a temperature sensor that goes in the ear, attached by a clip and an Electromyography sensor (EMG) that goes on the front right leg of the dog. Because dogs have fur I was unable to find a way to measure the heartbeat, but there is a new dog collar that measures heartbeat using a patented technology which utilizes low frequency radio waves. The sensors are connected to an Arduino that has an LED light strip attached to it on the outside of the coat. If the dog’s body temperature drops to below 95 degrees, the light strip glows red, and if the muscle contractions become very slow, the lights glow blue. In the case that both the temperature and muscle contraction times are at a dangerous level, the light strip glows purple. If I had a working heart rate monitor, I would have made the lights glow green for a slow pulse, yellow for both slow pulse and low body temperature, turquoise for slow muscle contractions, and white for if all three of the sensors detected problems.

  • The Iditarod is a 1,000 mile dog sled race across Alaska during which the sled dog racers must go through mountain ranges, frozen rivers, tundra, and blizzards in temperatures below zero degrees Fahrenheit. During these races, the dogs that pull the racers’ sleds can get hurt or even die without the racers knowing what is happening to them. Sled dogs can get hypothermia because their owners do not know how cold the dogs are, and they can also die of exhaustion since they must pull their owners, a sled, and survival gear in such frigid conditions. I have designed a coat for the sled dogs that can warn their owners about the beginnings of hypothermia, and also tell them when the dog needs a rest. The main signs of early hypothermia are a slow pulse and a body temperature below 95 degrees, while the sign of exhaustion is slowed muscle contractions. Because of these signs, my dog coat has a temperature sensor that goes in the ear, attached by a clip and an Electromyography sensor (EMG) that goes on the front right leg of the dog. Because dogs have fur I was unable to find a way to measure the heartbeat, but there is a new dog collar that measures heartbeat using a patented technology which utilizes low frequency radio waves. The sensors are connected to an Arduino that has an LED light strip attached to it on the outside of the coat. If the dog’s body temperature drops to below 95 degrees, the light strip glows red, and if the muscle contractions become very slow, the lights glow blue. In the case that both the temperature and muscle contraction times are at a dangerous level, the light strip glows purple. If I had a working heart rate monitor, I would have made the lights glow green for a slow pulse, yellow for both slow pulse and low body temperature, turquoise for slow muscle contractions, and white for if all three of the sensors detected problems.

  • The Sensors

    High altitude mountaineers push their bodies to the limits of what is humanly possible, often placing themselves on the brink of death. However, when hikers suffer from hypoxia, known as altitude sickness, they often fail to recognize the symptoms. This is due to the fact that one of the main side effects of hypoxia is severe confusion and a lack of mental clarity. By simply recognizing whether or not they have hypoxia, a hiker may be able to save his or her own life.

    Our product gives hikers this crucial information by using altitude, temperature, pulse, and blood oxygen content sensors. These sensors create a cohesive image of whether or not the hiker should continue hiking as normal, take a break, or descend from the mountain. The controller and other main electronics are housed inside an armband. On this armband is a simple and easy to read display which notifies hikers if they should continue hiking or not. The sensors are situated in a glove at the hiker's fingertips to collect accurate data. The first of two temperature sensors is placed at the hiker's finger to detect hypothermia. The second temperature sensor is placed in the armband, and paired with the pressure sensor it is able to measure altitude. Finally, we use pulse and oxygen saturation sensors to measure the users pulse and blood oxygen content. By calculating the drop in blood oxygen saturation as the hiker ascends the mountain, hypoxia can be detected. The pulse sensor provides another benchmark of the hiker's vitals. 

    The device checks for several conditions, and in the program assigns all the sensors a value of 0, 1, or 2. If the value is 0 it indicates that the hiker is not suffering from this condition. If the value is 1 it indicates that they should take a break, and a value of 2 indicates that they should descend. The program selects the highest alert value from all the sensors and uses this to detect the user's health.

    Final Product

    Our final product is a glove and armpiece combination that incorporates the aforementioned sensors. They have been tightly packed into a wrist strap and with very slim finger sensors as to add a minimal amount of bulk to the hiker's already very bulky equipment.The collective purpose of these sensors is to alert the hiker of any health threats he or she may face. The device notifies the wearer by means of the three LEDs that are placed in the top of the casing on the arm. If the green light is on, the wearer is ok to continue climbing. If the yellow light in the middle is on, the climber should stop before continuing on further. If the red light is on, the climber could be approaching a dangerous situation, and should descend from the mountain.

    The device does this by constantly checking the readouts from all four sensors. If the sensors detect that any of the readouts are out of the preset baseline readings, then they will notify the device, which could cause the device to change its alert setting.

    The sensors are attached to the inside of the glove via velcro attachments. They then wire directly into the armpiece, where the readouts are calculated, and the overall response is displayed in the LEDs.

  • Hypothermia is a serious danger to high altitude climbers. When a patient suffering from hypothermia is brought to a hospital for medical assistance, a doctor typically begins treating the patient by setting him or her up with a heated IV. Injecting warm saline solution into the body raises the patient’s core body temperature as well as hydrates and provides the patient with nutrients. This ultimately relieves hypothermia. A large problem is that often times those suffering from hypothermia do not have immediate access to medical assistance. We wanted to create a portable heated IV for extreme climate situations and/or high altitude climbers suffering from hypothermia or dehydration. This product is not supposed to heal a person completely, it is intended to be used as a temporary aid to prolong the user’s life until they can receive medical assistance.

    The device purifies the water using a cap with built in UV lights. This "purifier" screws into a separate compartment containing ceramic resistors that heat the IV drip reservoir. After being purified and heated, the water flows through the IV tubing until it reaches the needle. The needle is intended to be clipped into the specialized cuff created. The cuff is an 3D printed semi-circle placed on a person's forearm. The cuff is designed to simplify and secure the injection of the IV needle into the person's vein. The other compartments of the cannister hold other necessary components including the salt tablet/packet, a vein finder (Infrared light device), etc.

    The importance of the product is clear--it could be the defying factor of a high altitude climber's survival. Without the Portable Warm IV, a person could possibly die of hypothermia on the mountain but with the IV, the chance of his or her core body temperature warming enough to prolong the survival long enough to receive medical assistance is likely. There are no existing products that are capable of helping high altitude mountaineers let alone in extreme conditions return their body to a normal temperature. Since hypothermia is such a serious threat to the lives of mountaineers, it is crucial to have a device that would keep them alive at high altitudes and dangerously cold temperatures. The portable warm IV would bring the user fundamental and pragmatic medical attention immediately, making it a life-changing product... Literally.

  • We wanted to help firefighters before, during, and after a fire by evaluating and helping their breathing rate. We chose to help firefighters’ breathing rate due to their strenuous conditions that are typically overlooked by the general public. Numerous firefighters have said that their heart rate can go from complete rest to dangerous levels in a matter of seconds. We decided to create a neck piece with a stethoscope on one side (to measure the heart rate) with a vibration notification when the pulse is too high (over 120). This vibration acts as a warning to the firefighter to start breathing exercises and to be aware that their pulse has been elevated for too long. In medical emergencies, if the heart rate stays at an elevated level doctors can perform carotid artery massage.

    Rubbing the carotid sinus stimulates an area in the artery wall that contains nerve endings. These nerves respond to changes in blood pressure and are capable of slowing the heart rate. The response to this simple procedure often slows a rapid heart rate (for example, atrial flutter or atrial tachycardia), it important to massage in a circular motion for 5 seconds on one side of the neck (underneath the jaw). 

    In addition, we also created a carbon monoxide sensor that will the read carbon monoxide in the air and will warn the person through a buzzer when the carbon monoxide in the air is beginning to become too dangerous. Carbon monoxide as well as other numerous chemicals are in a fire’s smoke and are perilous to humans. This sensor later can be adjusted to read more hazardous chemicals in the smoke which will help firefighters lower their chances of cancer and other illnesses. Firefighters are frequently exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous materials including carbon monoxide, benzene, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, aldehydes, hydrogen chloride, dichlorofluoromethane, and particulates. Our aim was to prevent this exposure to these biomedical dangers. 

  • Amit and I spent most of today working on our presentation, and we came out with two awesome diagrams explaining the carbon monoxide and respiratory rate sensors (which I unfortunately don't have on my computer but they look really good, I swear), as well as the beginning of a process/final post, which I added to the portfolio. Sam persevered with further developing the respiratory/pulse sensor throughout and after the day, as well as combining Amit's functioning carbon monoxide Arduino code with all the other sensors in a cohesive, working way. 

     

  • We wanted to focus on creating a system to maintain healthy breathing for firefighters. Lack of oxygen causes an increased heart rate which can cause cardiac arrest or suffocation. We went through many iterations throughout this process to decide which element of breathing we wanted to focus on.  

    Iteration 1: oxygen saturation/ hypoxia: lack of oxygen to the brain (we wanted to measure the oxygen levels in their blood) this was a clip onto the finger/ ear so that they light could shine through

    We talked to firefighter and he said that since the oxygen tanks they use monitor their oxygen levels already, hydrogen cyanide is more of an issue. He described how after they would put out the fire there are usually still toxic gases in the air. 

    Iteration 2: Hydrogen Cyanide is a form of histotoxic hypoxia. Hydrogen Cyanide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death for firefighters. Hydrogen Cyanide results from burning polymer products that use Nitrile in their production; for example, vinyl. Hydrogen Cyanide poisoning most often occurs after the fire is extinguished and there are still toxic chemicals in the air. After the firefighters are done extinguishing, they will often take off their masks and safety gear, which makes them at risk for Cyanide Poisoning. Depending on the dosage of Hydrogen Cyanide in the air, inhaling a few breaths of this toxic gas, can result in death within minutes. It's like carbon monoxide poisoning, but much faster and more deadly. (firefighters frequently inhale toxic gases that linger in the air after a fire has been put out, they're at risk once they take their safety gear off often during the cleanup process) It 3 times more powerful than carbon monoxide when bonding to the hemoglobin. (the hemoglobin is the protein molecule in red blood cells that transfers oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and then returns with carbon dioxide from the tissues back to the lungs.) Unfortunately, hydrogen cyanide sensors are too expensive and are very difficult to replicate. Therefore as a placeholder, we created a carbon monoxide sensor.

    Iteration 3: Regulating breathing to decrease heart rate and form a healthy breathing pattern. Firemen aren't aware of their breathing and pulse when it is sky rocketing. Therefore they breathe in the toxic gas at faster rate and can prevent a heart attack. captain said "watch your air" and this way the firemen would have more time to save their oxygen and avoid having a heart attack. It is important to be aware of their breathing and pulse before it reaches dangerous levels. 

    Biometric-Respiratory Sensor: Originally, we started experimenting with the commercial pulse sensor to get a feel for how it worked. Unfortunately, it mystified even a literal rocket scientist from MIT, so we attempted constructing a pulse sensor from scratch using a photoresistor and a red LED. Ultimately this was also a failure. We attempted to incorporate the “stethoscope” design, which works by pressing against the firefighter's neck and reading their pulse rate.  The 3D printed piece and membrane coating direct sound into the mic and block out some external noise. It can sense audio signals when the heart beats, and it uses filtering algorithms to ignore speech, breathing and other interference. With this, we finally tried to meld the respiratory and pulse sensors, at which point we realized the pulse sensor was both superfluous and ineffective. This sensor is meant to measure firefighters’ respiratory rate in order to give them information on their well-being.

    Biometric-Carbon Monoxide Sensor: The carbon monoxide sensor and buzzer overall went as planned. To program both the sensor and buzzer was a simple code. The carbon monoxide code programmed the sensor to read the carbon monoxide in the air and give an output reading. Depending on the number read, the buzzer would go off until the carbon sensor reads a safer level of carbon monoxide. The higher amount of carbon monoxide in their air, the higher frequency the buzzer would give off. This sensor is meant to warn firefighters when there is a dangerous amount of carbon monoxide in the air and it is time to move locations.

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  • Oftentimes rescuers, adventurers and workers who bring us the raw materials for modern life find themselves in dangerous situations that put them on the Brink of Life - or the Brink of Death. In these moments, subtle decisions must be made instantly based on limited data. This studio will examine the biometric situation for those teetering on the edge of life and death and imagine innovations in wearable medical devices and integrated life support equipment that can help make sure users make informed decisions and come out alive.

    The studio is organized into two section:

    Biometrics - This section will focus on the hardware and software design of the wearable components as well as data processing and output for visualization. Based on use group conditions, equipment, and medical challenges, students will identify, design, build and program sensors from the ground up and encase them as a deliverable to be integrated into Interface designs.

    Interface - This section will focus on improving, augmenting, or redefining aspects of the brink life support equipment. Based on the environmental, behavioral, and equipment needs of the use groups, we will reconsider the idea of wearables in order to improve safety and add functionality while integrating the sensors and data output designs from the other section.

Brink: Biometric Interface | Interface

by David Wang, Andrew Todd Marcus

Brink: Biometric Interface | Biometrics

by Andrew Todd Marcus, David Wang, Mahek Shah