Super-Enabling Devices (S1_D)

Final Presentation-finger paint brush

David Wang and 2 OthersSophie Sproule
Elizabeth Armstrong
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Final Presentation

David Wang and 4 OthersAlex A
William Sadler
Roman Dickinson
Iain M.
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Final Presentation

Aditya Gusain and Myles C.
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Our FINAL PRESENTATION!  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .  . ..  . .. . . . . . . .  .. . . YEAH!

Music-Go-Round (Presentation Example)

Stefano Pagani
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The Music Box is a project worked on in collaboration with the Karam school, located in Reyhanli, Turkey. The school has a large population of Syrian refugees, who are creating a  playground to install for community use and engagement. The Music Box is an installation piece meant for the playground which allows children to play and explore the creation of music. It has been shown that both play and music accelerate brain development in the language and sound processing centers of the brain, especially for developing children. The music box is made up of two cylinders. The inner cylinder holds the comb, which is a series of flat steel pieces that get plucked by the pegs positioned in the outer cylinder when the kids spin it. The kids can ride on the pegs as it spins around. The pegs also are interchangeable so the user can create their own series of tones by the positioning of the peg. The design takes into account that there will be many different users with a range of ages, by including components that are fun and engaging for everyone, Such as the spinning aspect for the kids and the platform to sit for parents.

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THE PRESENTATION POST

This post's privacy is set to Everyone. This post showcases your final design by telling the comprehensive story of how your idea was born, developed, and manifested. The arc of the story should encompass the, How of your project in a compelling narrative. It showcases your design process including your brainstorming, each of your iterations, and your final prototype. It allows the viewer to delve deeply into your process.

  • Every Slide should have a Title and Caption.
    The body of this post is The Brief. You should include a version of the Brief for each collaborator in the project.
  • This post will be used in your review presentation at the end of the session.

You are encouraged to make your narrative as compelling as possible. All of the content below should be included, but if you would like to rearrange the material in order to tell your story differently, work with your coach.


INTRODUCTION PORTION

Your presentation is a narrative, and the introduction sets up the scene for that story. Here you introduce the project, say why it is important, and summarize what you did.

TITLE WITH TAGLINE: This slides shows a crisp, clear final image and the title of your project. with a pithy blurb describing the project. The image, name, and tagline should draw a viewer in. 

Examples:

  • The Fruit - A line following, light tracking robot
  • Segmented Vehicle - A vehicle that conforms to the landscape
  • Cacoon - Wearable sculpture exploring the concept of transformation and death

EVOCATIVE  IMAGE: This is a single image that shows a clear image that evokes the soul of your project. This image helps set up the why in a compelling way, sets the stage for your narrative, and will help frame the entire presentation. The caption of this slide (set with the Edit Captions button when editing your post) should discuss the context of your project. No Text on the slide.

THESIS STATEMENT: This is a TEXT ONLY slide for which briefly describes the Soul and Body of your project. You can use the project description from your Brief or write something new. This statement ties together your narrative.

Examples:

  • The Cocoon:  A wearable sculpture that explores the concept of transformations and death. The Cocoon explores the spiritual journey beyond the human experience; what it means to be human, how wonder effects us, and the concept of what happens after death.
  • Body Accordion: A musical prosthetic that translates the wearer’s body movements into a dynamic multimedia performance. The Body Accordion converts flex sensor input to sound through Arduino, MaxMSP, and Ableton Live. 
  • Seed to Soup Animation: A whimsical animation about the slow food movement. Seed to Soup showcases a holistic method of cooking. From garden, to kitchen, to dinner table.
  • Antlers: A wearable sculpture inspired by antlers found in the deer and antelope family. "Antlers" explores the comparison between armor and attraction. 

PROCESS PORTION

The Process Portion of your presentation tells the story of how you iteratively developed your project. Somewhere in that story you should include conceptual and technical precedents that guided you at each stage as well as brainstorming and process sketches and clear photo booth imagery for 3-4 stages of your process.

This portion is made up of three types of slides repeated 3-4 times. Each iteration in your process should include:

  • PRECEDENTS:  Precedents are any projects that inspired you creatively or gave you technical guidance. These can include conceptual precedents and technical precedents. No Text.
  • SKETCHES/SKETCH CONCEPT DIAGRAMS: These slides show your generative ideas in sketch form. These should clean, clear drawings. A sketch should show a clear idea. Do not simply scan a messy sketchbook page and expect that people will understand. If you do not have a clear concept or working sketches it is fine to make them after the fact. No Text.
  • PROTOTYPE IMAGES:  These are actual images of the prototypes  you documented in your daily posts. These images illustrate your design decisions and how your project changed at each step. No Text.

FINAL PORTION

The Final stage of your presentation is the resolution of your narrative and shows your completed work. The use diagram shows how your project works and the construction diagram shows how it is assembled. Final photos show the project both in action and at rest. The imagery captures your final built design.

USE DIAGRAM: A diagram showing some aspect of the functionality. These can include:

  • How one uses or interacts with the project
  • The overall behavior of the project over time
  • For a complex interactive project, this can be a clear diagram of the software behavior

MECHANICAL DIAGRAM:  A diagram offering insight on how the project is put together and functions technically.

  • Ideally, this will be an exploded axonometric
  • At minimum this can be a labeled disassembled photo  

ELECTRONICS or OTHER DIAGRAM: Additional diagrams showing some important aspect of your design. 

IMAGERY: The last slides should have an images of the final project. These images should be taken in the photo booth, cropped, and adjusted for contrast, brightness, etc. Images should include:

  • An image of the project in use (taken in the booth or at large). This should include a human interacting with the project.
  • Images of project alone. Include at least one overall image and one detail image.
  • You can also use an image In-Use. 
  • Consider using a GIF to show how the project works. 

 

post 10 -ghotos

Kıfah Abdulsalam
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Simple Ratchet Design

Dyani Robarge
1 / 9
ratchet_simple.dxf

For this ratchet design, you will need:

  • 1/8" plywood, 150 mm x 300 mm
  • 1/4" dowel rod, 45 mm long
  • Four bolts, 3 mm x 20 mm
  • Two wood screws, #4 x 1/2"
  • Four nuts, 3 mm
  • Small spring (this example uses a click pen's spring, 3/16" diameter)
  • Wood glue
  • Small clamps
  • Small screwdriver

Simple Ratchet Design

Dyani Robarge
1 / 9
ratchet_simple.dxf

For this ratchet design, you will need:

  • 1/8" plywood, 150 mm x 300 mm
  • 1/4" dowel rod, 45 mm long
  • Four bolts, 3 mm x 20 mm
  • Two wood screws, #4 x 1/2"
  • Four nuts, 3 mm
  • Small spring (this example uses a click pen's spring, 3/16" diameter)
  • Wood glue
  • Small clamps
  • Small screwdriver

Presentation Instructions

Andrew Todd Marcus
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You will be creating your presentation on the NuVu Platform.

Things to do/think about:

  • Your presentation should be located in the Portfolio tab of your project.
  • There should be (1) post titled Process with all of the slides.
  • If needed, you can have (1) post of a video of your project in action.
  • All slides should have a title. You can add titles when editing the post
  • With the exception of the Title slide NO TEXT SHOULD APPEAR ON YOUR SLIDES.
  • Only (1) image per slide. NO GOOGLE DOCS!!!
  • Be sure to add your team members as collaborators and make the (2) posts Public.
  • Only one team member can edit a post at a time!
  • Presentations should be no longer than 3 minutes. PRACTICE!

1st Post : Presentation (The name of the post should be the name of your project)

Absolutely no more than 8 Slides!

1 Intention Slide. For build projects, describe the Problem and Solution. For conceptual projects this can be expressed as Intention/Solution. The slide should include the name of the project and a one sentence statement of both the problem and the solution.

Example:
Segmented Vehicle
Problem: Design a vehicle for a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse.
Solution:  A segmented vehicle with a universal joint system handles mountainous terrain by conforming to the landscape.
 
1  Precedent Slides. One slide to show conceptual idea. One slide to show mechanical or functional idea.
 

1 Brainstorming Slide. This should be a clean sketch of your initial ideas. If you do not have a nice drawing or lost yours, create one now!

2 Iteration Slides. These slides should show early prototypes of your design. Focus on big changes. You do not need to show tiny Changes.

3 Final Slides. These should show clean images of your final project.

Text:

In the text section for the process post, write a paragraph introducing the design problem or the main idea and how you are tackling it. Then, describe the main story or theme, mechanics, development, challenges, and other parts of the creative process you experienced. Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

1. Design Problem and Solution:

You should begin with a clear statement of the problem and the solution as both a one sentence description and a short paragraph expanding on the solution.

Here is an example from the Reaction Shelter project:

  • The Problem: Over 300 natural disasters occur globally every year, displacing 32.5 million people on average.Domestically, 99 federal disaster declarations were on file with FEMA in 2011.
  • The Solution: The Reaction Housing System is a rapid response, short-term housing solution.
  • Detailed Solution: The core system components flat pack to provide extremely efficient storage and transportation. The systems can be deployed within hours of an event without the need for tools or heavy machinery.

2. Further Elaboration:

  • Main Story or Theme: describe in further detail the reason for your project and the overall way you are solving that problem
  • Mechanics: Describe how your project works and what it is doing
  • Development: Briefly explain the progression of your project
  • Challenges: Describe technical and design challenges you faced or are still facing. 

3. Iterations

Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

Here is an example from the Backcountry IV Project:

  • In our second iteration, we redesigned the cylinder so that it actually had two compartments that would screw together. Though there were two compartments, there would be a small piece in between the two that would screw them together, so that they remained the same diameter and size. We designed the piece to fit exactly between the two compartments so that it wouldn’t be visible when the entire piece was together. The part had triangular shaped spaces cutting through it where the IV tube and wires for the technology side of our studio fit. In the upper cylinder, the holes remained for the UV lights, but there was more space underneath for the Arduino. In the bottom compartment, we created a hole in the middle designed to fit the IV reservoir and tubing, and small spaces directly next to the reservoir where the resistors to warm the reservoir sat. This spacing for the pieces worked well, except that the entire reservoir piece took up too much room, so much that all of the compartments didn’t screw together. Underneath the inner part designed to hold the reservoir and resistors, there was room underneath to hold the arm cuff and the excess tubing. We also designed two caps to close together the whole piece. Except for the fact that it was a bit sharp and there some minor fitting issues, the caps worked well and made the entire piece compact and portable. For the next iteration, which was the final one, we made a few critical changes.

2nd Post: Video

Upload a short video showing your project in action. Do not count on your project working as you expect during the presentation.

 

 

The Fashionable Lift Vest

Rosa Weinberg
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