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  • We sought to solve the timeless problem of discomfort in high heel-wearers. Such discomfort often leads to intense pain and carrying a multitude of more comfortable shoes everywhere just to minimize wearing heels. Previous attempts at a changeable high heel have been either ugly or difficult to use. Our final iteration is composed mostly of three 3D-printed components that we created in Rhino, a modeling software. The heel and upper sole parts can notch securely together, as well as easily detach for a lowered position. The bottom of those parts are hinged to the base piece—which provides overall support and structure—to facilitate a more fluid downward motion. There are also two high-quality leather straps per shoe, which we fashioned ourselves with the help of Jenny Milwid, a professional leatherworker. Both straps are laced through a hidden slot in the back of the heel, and while the shorter strap wraps around the user's ankle, the other goes down the foot and through another hidden slot in the toe.

  • Our on-and-off work (the combined time was about two months) on this project has culminated in this latest iteration. At first, we were focused on the mechanism, and how to make the concept of an adaptive high heel come to life. We made a few different prototypes, but we liked the idea of the shoe constructed out of different parts, so the actual heel could fold down into the rest of the shoe, which would also create a unique, interesting design. We found a template for the outline of a high heel, and from that created a high heel in a modeling software called Rhino. The sole was split in two and hinged,  just below the toe, to make an easier (and possible) transition from low to high positions. The bottom of the heel component was hinged to the lower sole, so both pieces could move. The heel and upper sole were notched together, rather than hinged, but the notch we designed in this initial iteration was weak and not secure. The overall shape was also not stylish, uncomfortable, and led to a certain fragility that meant we didn’t feel safe walking on it.

     

    With new knowledge on high heel design, we remodeled the notch and designed our own shoe shape. Where our first iteration was too skinny, this iteration was too big. Inspired by an actual human foot, it was more comfortable but still drastically lacking in style. Although we wanted to be distinct from a typical high heel, we also wanted our product to look as good as possible. The new notch was also much too tight, and required the user to pull at an unreasonable angle and with unreasonable strength. We also added slots to the side of the upper sole and base, for lacing straps.


    For our spring independent project, we fixed the remaining problems, with a focus on making the heel user-friendly and beautiful. One of our more major accomplishments was the addition of straps, which took many iterations and adjustments in the design of the heel. We wanted the attachment method to be as discreet as possible, so we experimented with a lot of different methods for concealment. We were drawn to lacing the straps through the back of the heel, which is mostly not paid attention to. After trying horizontal slots, four slots, side slots, and slots that went through the heel entirely, we decided on simplicity: one vertical channel (which is the equivalent of two slots), and one slot in the base, which is mostly hidden in the new reveal.  Jenny Milwid, a professional leatherworker, came in to teach us about using leather and lend us her tools and high-quality leather. From there, we cut our own straps with holes and buckles, and made two for each shoe. We also redesigned the shape of the shoe to be both distinct and beautiful, and made a notch that can attach securely as well as detach easily.

  • In a futuristic world, the environment lacks gravity and as a result, humans and objects cannot stay planted on Earth. Not only are all objects now floating, but heavy winds also sweep us up and off into space. Ideally, we would like to stay planted on Earth so humans can survive.

    Initially, we dove into our project by brainstorming ways that humans would be able to survive on a planet that had no gravity and heavy winds. To begin the design process, we looked into kites and human flying squirrel suits to potentially find ideas of how to tackle the main problem of heavy winds on Earth. At first, we brainstormed the concept of a wearable kite that could help one fly through the environment. Rather than designing a piece of "clothing," we wanted to design a wearable mechanism. The idea was to brainstorm various kites on a human body.

    Next, we experimented with the idea of having spider legs that weighed you down into the ground and could walk along with you as you walked. Essentially, the leg would weigh you down as the wheel/spider leg would help mobilize you. The idea was inspired by plant roots. To create a mobilizing mechanism, we looked into three different methods. The first was inspired by spider claws that would have fingers and legs that would walk along with the wearable. We also looked at a tread concept that would roll alongside.

    Lastly, we explored the idea of wheels like on a tricycle or office chair that would use three wheels (2 in the front followed by 1 in the back to motorize the piece).

    Our team chose to incorporate the spider claw inspired mobility device to walk our piece. Moreover, the wearable has legs that attach to the mobility device that are attached to a piece of felt that adds movement and some stiffness to the piece. To design the legs, we had to think about whether or not we wanted a hinged leg that can swing in different directions, or a linear leg that came out at a 90 degree angle to the ground. Because the hinged leg provided too much mobility, we chose the linear leg that could spike into the ground. The final iteration of the wearable had a range of legs spread out around the bottom piece of felt that provided a spider like mobility device.

  • In a futuristic world, the environment lacks gravity and as a result, humans and objects cannot stay planted on Earth. Not only are all objects now floating, but heavy winds also sweep us up and off into space. Ideally, we would like to stay planted on Earth so humans can survive.

    Initially, we dove into our project by brainstorming ways that humans would be able to survive on a planet that had no gravity and heavy winds. To begin the design process, we looked into kites and human flying squirrel suits to potentially find ideas of how to tackle the main problem of heavy winds on Earth. At first, we brainstormed the concept of a wearable kite that could help one fly through the environment. Rather than designing a piece of "clothing," we wanted to design a wearable mechanism. The idea was to brainstorm various kites on a human body.

    Next, we experimented with the idea of having spider legs that weighed you down into the ground and could walk along with you as you walked. Essentially, the leg would weigh you down as the wheel/spider leg would help mobilize you. The idea was inspired by plant roots. To create a mobilizing mechanism, we looked into three different methods. The first was inspired by spider claws that would have fingers and legs that would walk along with the wearable. We also looked at a tread concept that would roll alongside.

    Lastly, we explored the idea of wheels like on a tricycle or office chair that would use three wheels (2 in the front followed by 1 in the back to motorize the piece).

    Our team chose to incorporate the spider claw inspired mobility device to walk our piece. Moreover, the wearable has legs that attach to the mobility device that are attached to a piece of felt that adds movement and some stiffness to the piece. To design the legs, we had to think about whether or not we wanted a hinged leg that can swing in different directions, or a linear leg that came out at a 90 degree angle to the ground. Because the hinged leg provided too much mobility, we chose the linear leg that could spike into the ground. The final iteration of the wearable had a range of legs spread out around the bottom piece of felt that provided a spider like mobility device.

  • Continuing from the Mark I mask we made in the Uno Space studio, there were two main goals in mind going into the IPP session: To make a functional, wearable, glove; and to make a well crafted, organized second version of the Mask. From this there were two main processes: The glove building, and the Mask Building. In the end, we finished with a fully functional, and wearable glove, and a fragile, yet beautiful Mask Mark II. Just because I gave Mark I the nickname "yeti," I'll name this Mark II version "Guy" mask because it reminds me of Guy Manuel of Daft Punk.

     

    Glove:

    Starting this studio, the glove had a 1st gen version of the wristband, pressure sensors, and rings that worked, but weren't perfect. 

    First, we made better rings, with holes that were not too small, and not too big either. There was minimal protrusion from the hole on this version. 

    We also made a better version of the wristband, this time with a battery slot, and a hole for the wires to feed through.

    Next, we made a pinky ring because the regular sized rings were not fitting on the pinky's first knuckle; the hole's diameter was too big. 

    From there, we decided the rings were finalized, and started to play around with conductivity to incorporate the switch in a more seamless way than just having two male connectors to touch each other. 

    Next, we organize all the wires and use electric tape to separate them in an organized way, and connect them to the arduino on the Wristband, and the Glove is complete.

     

    Mask:

    The mask design was started a little late in the two weeks. We started with Rhino, and make difference arches based on approximate measurements of my face. From there we designed a model and laid out the pieces for the laser cutter. There were a few design changes along the way, such as the addition of the ear pieces, or the shape of the tiles, but none of those were physically iterated because of material conservation. After everything was cut out, everything was assembled to make the mask. Because of how small we made the Ear Pieces, the mask itself is a little fragile, but is still strong enough to be worn. The holes for the LED's didn't line up properly, so the LED strip ended up being hot glued in a last minute effort to have the mask presentable that Thursday. The mask is near perfect, and if I ever have the opportunity to make another one, I already know which issues need fixing, and how to fix them.



  • Our design is based off the idea that every girl wanted to be a princess with fairy wings sometime in their childhood. And with this project, we want to give them this experience. By making these wings that you can control as you like,  it gives young girls the opportunity to enjoy their childhood to the fullest.

    This project is quite simple. We've created a mechanism that is made of several wooden sticks conjoined at certain angles and positions that allows you to extend and contract the length of the wings at will. This contraption allows us to change the shape of the wings by only moving a singular piece.

    1st Iteration: Cardboard linkage mechanism test:

    Our first Iteration was made of cardboard, we just wanted to test out what were some possible positions for how we should place the cardboard pieces so that we could extend the wings and make sure it is flexible and operational. From the first draft; we notice that the wings cannot extend very well and always gets stuck. Therefore, we need the specific measurement of the length and the angles. Although we did not get into the right spot on our first try, the way that we put the sticks together gave us ideas to make it better.

    1.5 Iteration: Thin Wood - improved rod shape (skeletal) Improved mechanism

    After we figured out the specific measurement; we decided to use thin wood for testing if it’s going to work in when we use a harder material, such as t. During this time we got the numbers, harder wood sticks, and screws. We made it works a lot better, compare to the previous one. The wings can flap well and it is stable, but one things we still want a little bit is that the wings were lack of moving rotationally. In order to make the wings flap around ; we used 3D printer to print a ball joint so that it would move around.

    2nd Iteration: Thick wood - wing tip shape, back panel + harness

    We also tried using thick wood for making the sticks stable, because we thought maybe it would be stronger and easier to use. At first,we just made one part of the wings with the thick wood to support the other heavy wood, but it was hard to operate properly, because the joints were really firm and would not slide smoothly. We tried several different ways of working with the thick wood, including adding another piece to the structure. But that didn’t really help and we gave up attempting to use the thick wood to make our final design. Because of this, we decided to change the wood back to something that would be easy to move.

    Diagrams/ Final Pictures

    3rd/Final: Thin wood w/ improved back panel + foot cuff

    In the end, we decided to that our original idea was the best. Due to the failure with the thick wood, thin wood looked as if it was the best material for us to use in the final design. After looking at our earlier iteration, we thought of what we could improve by changing the shape. We also changed the back panel, into a better one, that looks better, and allows the wings to perform better. We also created a foot cuff, so that we could attach the string to it and allow us to operate the extention of the wings with our feet. That ended up working really well, and we improved it to what it looks like today.

     

  • The designs in this studio are all based on or inspired by the planets in the book " The hitchhikers guide to the galaxy". Me and Nuradin were partners. We both read up on the book and the next day came back with three possible planets. As did everyone else. We picked the planet Traal, a jungle planet home to one of the most dangerous creatures in the universe. Fortunately while being very fierce this beast, The ravenous bugblatter beast of Traal, is also the stupidest creature in the universe. It is so stupid that it thinks that if you cant see it, it cant see you.

    From that sprouted many ideas of something that would be useful to someone on this planet. The first one was to have some sort of dress or stole with flaps on it that would flip up and cover someone's eyes. That idea would probably take too much time and work for just two weeks so we put that idea in our back pocket and moved on. The design that we settled on was a dress that would go above your head (to cover your face) and also have names written everywhere. This was design was inspired by the way the bugblatter beast of Traal writes the names of everyone he kills outside of his cave. The next day we took the signatures of Rosie, Nuradin and myself and we uploaded it to rhino and cut it out on a piece of fabric. Once we had settled on this design, we started thinking of ways to attach to the body. Nuradin had the idea of making a crown of sorts that would be able to attach to the head so it would hang down. Then we started working on measuring the red body and putting it into Rhino. The design that we ended up with was something with a front and a back. They are also split into three parts. The part that will attach to the crown, the torso and the piece that goes down. After we cut them out we sewed the pieces together with the help of Rosie. When we found something that worked I went around Nuvu with a clipboard asking for peoples signatures. After most people signed we uploaded it to the computer and put it onto the dress. When we cut that out we glued on a peice of gold fabric to the back for that extra pizzazzz but also to make the names more ledgible. Then Rosie sew on a zipper. The helmet is 3d printed and has large rods that stick out so it goes above your head.

  • In a futuristic world, the environment lacks gravity and as a result, humans and objects cannot stay planted on Earth. Not only are all objects now floating, but heavy winds also sweep us up and off into space. Ideally, we would like to stay planted on Earth so humans can survive.

    Initially, we dove into our project by brainstorming ways that humans would be able to survive on a planet that had no gravity and heavy winds. To begin the design process, we looked into kites and human flying squirrel suits to potentially find ideas of how to tackle the main problem of heavy winds on Earth. At first, we brainstormed the concept of a wearable kite that could help one fly through the environment. Rather than designing a piece of "clothing," we wanted to design a wearable mechanism. The idea was to brainstorm various kites on a human body.

    Next, we experimented with the idea of having spider legs that weighed you down into the ground and could walk along with you as you walked. Essentially, the leg would weigh you down as the wheel/spider leg would help mobilize you. The idea was inspired by plant roots. To create a mobilizing mechanism, we looked into three different methods. The first was inspired by spider claws that would have fingers and legs that would walk along with the wearable. We also looked at a tread concept that would roll alongside.

    Lastly, we explored the idea of wheels like on a tricycle or office chair that would use three wheels (2 in the front followed by 1 in the back to motorize the piece).

    Our team chose to incorporate the spider claw inspired mobility device to walk our piece. Moreover, the wearable has legs that attach to the mobility device that are attached to a piece of felt that adds movement and some stiffness to the piece. To design the legs, we had to think about whether or not we wanted a hinged leg that can swing in different directions, or a linear leg that came out at a 90 degree angle to the ground. Because the hinged leg provided too much mobility, we chose the linear leg that could spike into the ground. The final iteration of the wearable had a range of legs spread out around the bottom piece of felt that provided a spider like mobility device.