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  • The first day at NuVu. I love the lunch very much!

    #A test blog#

  • You will be creating your presentation on the NuVu Platform.

    Things to do/think about:

    • Your presentation should be located in the Portfolio tab of your project.
    • There should be (1) post titled Process with all of the slides.
    • If needed, you can have (1) post of a video of your project in action.
    • All slides should have a title. You can add titles when editing the post
    • With the exception of the Title slide NO TEXT SHOULD APPEAR ON YOUR SLIDES.
    • Only (1) image per slide. NO GOOGLE DOCS!!!
    • Be sure to add your team members as collaborators and make the (2) posts Public.
    • Only one team member can edit a post at a time!
    • Presentations should be no longer than 3 minutes. PRACTICE!

    1st Post : Process

    Absolutely no more than 8 Slides!

    1 Intention Slide. For build projects, describe the Problem and Solution. For conceptual projects this can be expressed as Intention/Solution. The slide should include the name of the project and a one sentence statement of both the problem and the solution.

    Example:
    Segmented Vehicle
    Problem: Design a vehicle for a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse.
    Solution:  A segmented vehicle with a universal joint system handles mountainous terrain by conforming to the landscape.
     
    1  Precedent Slides. One slide to show conceptual idea. One slide to show mechanical or functional idea.
     

    1 Brainstorming Slide. This should be a clean sketch of your initial ideas. If you do not have a nice drawing or lost yours, create one now!

    2 Iteration Slides. These slides should show early prototypes of your design. Focus on big changes. You do not need to show tiny Changes.

    3 Final Slides. These should show clean images of your final project.

    Text:

    In the text section for the process post, write a paragraph introducing the design problem or the main idea and how you are tackling it. Then, describe the main story or theme, mechanics, development, challenges, and other parts of the creative process you experienced. Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

    1. Design Problem and Solution:

    You should begin with a clear statement of the problem and the solution as both a one sentence description and a short paragraph expanding on the solution.

    Here is an example from the Reaction Shelter project:

    • The Problem: Over 300 natural disasters occur globally every year, displacing 32.5 million people on average.Domestically, 99 federal disaster declarations were on file with FEMA in 2011.
    • The Solution: The Reaction Housing System is a rapid response, short-term housing solution.
    • Detailed Solution: The core sustem components flat pack to provide extremeley efficient storage and transportation. The systems can be deployed within hours of an event without the need for tools or heavy machinery.

    2. Further Ellaboration:

    • Main Story or Theme: describe in further detail the reason for your project and the overall way you are solving that problem
    • Mechanics: Describe how your project works and what it is doing
    • Development: Briefly explain the progression of your project
    • Challenges: Describe technical and design challenges you faced or are still facing. 

    3. Iterations

    Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

    Here is an example from the Backcountry IV Project:

    • In our second iteration, we redesigned the cylinder so that it actually had two compartments that would screw together. Though there were two compartments, there would be a small piece in between the two that would screw them together, so that they remained the same diameter and size. We designed the piece to fit exactly between the two compartments so that it wouldn’t be visible when the entire piece was together. The part had triangular shaped spaces cutting through it where the IV tube and wires for the technology side of our studio fit. In the upper cylinder, the holes remained for the UV lights, but there was more space underneath for the Arduino. In the bottom compartment, we created a hole in the middle designed to fit the IV reservoir and tubing, and small spaces directly next to the reservoir where the resistors to warm the reservoir sat. This spacing for the pieces worked well, except that the entire reservoir piece took up too much room, so much that all of the compartments didn’t screw together. Underneath the inner part designed to hold the reservoir and resistors, there was room underneath to hold the arm cuff and the excess tubing. We also designed two caps to close together the whole piece. Except for the fact that it was a bit sharp and there some minor fitting issues, the caps worked well and made the entire piece compact and portable. For the next iteration, which was the final one, we made a few critical changes.

    2nd Post: Video

    Upoload a short video showing your project in action. Do not count on your project working as you expect during the presentation.

     

     

  • Our world is mountainous with difficult terrain to traverse. The ‘Segmented Mountain Climber’ is able to deftly maneuver up and down the steep mountainsides, and over their sharp peaks. Its Whegs, half wheel half legs, are able to climb over both small rocks and large boulders. It can also quickly reverse, turn and is able to continue movement even if flipped upside down. 

    Our original idea was a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse. We started by brainstorming many different models that could help climb mountains. We decided on a segmented car which could work best in a mountainous situation by conforming to the landscape. It’s called ‘Segmented Mountain Climber’.

         During the first few days, we thought of various shapes for the vehicle, drawing inspiration from existing creations including roller coasters, snakes and trains. Then we brainstormed various designs for the wheels, including tank treads, legs, many small wheels, and large powered wheels.

         In order to better visualize the connections and turning of the segments, we made our first prototype of the large-wheeled model. In essence, it was just a trio of cardboard boxes tied together with string, with an axle and pair of wheels through each segment. However, some clear problems came up: the connection was not sturdy enough, and the wheels failed to rotate. We discussed at length how to incorporate the right wheels and connectors into our design. We started looking at other possible wheel choices, and then we settled on wegs. A weg is essentially a spoked wheel with the rim removed. Deriving its name from the words "wheel" and "leg," it could use circular motion, but with legs. Compared to traditional wheels, they could climb over obstructions and had superior grip. We also decided to replace the strings. At first, we had considered ball joints by virtue of their versatility, however we chose to nix the ball joints in favor of universal joints, because they could be better incorporated into the segments. Universal joints are basically two axles intersecting at a point, offering flexibility in two dimensions. Furthermore, the ability to transfer torque is exclusive to universal joints, so they could prevent any one segment from falling over. 

        Taking these considerations into account, we replaced the string and wheels on our prototype with universal joints and wegs. Upon finishing, we realized that the wegs in the prototype had the right structure but would not rotate because of the material (cardboard), the number of legs (4), and the structure of the foot. We decided that a 6-legged wooden weg would work better, and we redesigned the shape of the foot to include rubber that could provide traction. Another problem was the turning, we considered models such as rack-and-pinion, which was too delicate and complicated, and exploiting right-and-left rotation differences, which wouldn't work as well in a multi-car design such as ours. We decided on using a servo to rotate the first compartment relative to the others, turning the rest in due course. We didn't know, however, how we could incorporate the servo into the overall design. We decided that the joints would be included into the design of the car segments, and the servo would be attached to the foremost universal joint via a 3D-printed attachment. Unfortunately, a problem inherent to servos was the elimination of one of the two axes of rotation; as a result, the first and second compartments would always stay firm on uneven ground.

    Finally, after considering all these issues, we crafted the final product, learning from our previous errors. We used wood, which is much sturdier than cardboard; we used wegs, capable of scaling obstacles, and we used a servo to turn and manipulate the vehicle. We connected the motors and servo to an Arduino controlled by a remote. Overall, we had many separate design challenges; in the end, however, all the components came together to form a polished final product.


  • Project by Jack Flahive & Eran Shapiro

    The inspiration for our project originated from the idea of perpetual motion. We began to develop this idea of perpetual motion. The time constraint made this rather difficult to achieve, but moving forward we would like to aspire to achieving our goal of having perpetual motion. Despite this, we did achieve in creating the mechanism for picking and placing boxes. One could envision four of the robots passing boxes to eachother.

  • next

  • Engines charged. Robots ready and programmed. Gadgets ready. Go! This is Battlebotics - you have 3 minutes to show your robot’s might, secure as many points, defend your territory and conquer an arena with other robots stealthily moving about you! In this arena, your team will compete to become the champion of NuVu Battlebotics!

    In this Studio, students will be constructing remote-controlled robot vehicles that will compete in NuVu Battlebotics, NuVu’s premier robot games. In 3 minutes, each student team will maneuver their custom machine around terrain filled with surprises to try and gain the most points! Student teams will be given a set of supplies, equipment, and tools that they can use to design and build their robots. Creativity is the only limitation! Students will learn about all the components that make their vehicle go vroom: motors, batteries, engines, radio signals, types of chassis and wheels, and robotic intelligence. Students will ride the waves of radio frequency and modulation, therefore understanding how transmitters and receivers communicate. Other topics of discussion include on-road versus off-road suspension, how RC models compare to full-sized cars, and levels of robotic intelligence (automaton, remote control, teleoperation, full autonomy). Students will experience the hands-on joy of soldering, drilling, and building circuits before applying a custom paint job for the finishing touch. Then it’s off to the arena where the robots will enter and greet each other for NuVu Battlebotics!

    Register here!

    Focus Skills/Subjects/Technologies:

      Design

      Physics (Electricity, Magnetism)

      Engineering

      Programming

      Electronics

       Robotics (Arduino)

      Sensors & Actuators

       Digital Fabrication (Laser-cutting, 3d Printing)

       3d Modeling

    Prerequisites:

    • Enrolling students must be between the ages of 11 to 18 (middle and high school students)

  • Today we finished our final idea. Our final idea had to get through many prototyping, drawing and editng stages to get where we are. There were many ideas about the design and even though at first we didnt like the idea we finally came through to make it. Even our final idea had ideas because there were many different pieces to make and design and at some points it seemed like we had finalized some part we realized that there was something wrong with that idea. The idea that we finally came up with was originally pushed to the side because we thought that we had a better idea. But in fact it actually was going to be to hard to assemble and the final was a more concrete idea. Our idea went through many stages including cardboard and hand drawings.

  • Project Team: Benedict Fernando, Grady Haffey, Jack Mullaney, Brewer Daley, Dalton Vassallo

    We came up with the idea to make two remote-controlled Mario Karts designed on 2 separate themes that would battle each other and try to pop the balloons located on each of the other's body frame. One of the Karts was designed to look like a Porcupine combined with the strength of a shuriken, a traditional Japanese concealed weapon that is generally used for throwing. The second Kart was designed to look like a Bumble Bee, agile and buoyant.

  • This studio had two goals; to make something using the new linear actuators and to stress test the linear actuators for the coaches who were developing a new product. Using the linear actuators, we created Hexabot, which is essentially a six-legged spider robot. We used one linear actuator and one servo per leg to control the height and the rotation. We wanted to build a walking robot by the end of the studio.

    The robot can easily lift itself and a payload of about 2 kilograms. Each of the legs is attached to the central hexagonal base using loose pin hinges. The servo on each of the legs is linked to the base using a four bar linkage. Since the linkage is in the shape of a parallelogram, the servo horn will always stay parallel to the side of the base. This makes it easier to program and control the rotation of each leg.

    Each leg is also made using a four bar linkage in the shape of a parallelogram. This shape is beneficial because the part of the leg that is hitting the ground does not rotate. If it did rotate, the robot would have difficulty balancing. The actuator is attached to the upper point on the side closest to the base and to the lower point on the side furthest away from the base. When the actuator pulls, the leg is lowered, effectively lifting the robot. Likewise, when the actuator is released and goes back to its normal state, the leg is raised, lowering the robot.

    While building this robot, we tested, broke, and helped make improvements to the linear actuators brought in by our coaches. This was one of the few studios where breaking what we were given was a “good” thing. With each break, they sought to create a shield from it happening again. Whether it needed a stronger motor, higher torque gears, or redesigning break points, the process of building Hexabot allowed them to create a more complete product. Though it slowed the overall process of building the Hexabot, we were able to give them a proper amount of feedback.

    In the end, the Hexabot was built to spec. Six linear actuators, six servos, six legs, and a six-sided base made up our walking spider robot. Improvements can most definitely still be made, but where it stands, or squats rather, we have a fully functioning Hexabot.


  • Project by Jack Flahive & Eran Shapiro

    The inspiration for our project originated from the idea of perpetual motion. We began to develop this idea of perpetual motion. The time constraint made this rather difficult to achieve, but moving forward we would like to aspire to achieving our goal of having perpetual motion. Despite this, we did achieve in creating the mechanism for picking and placing boxes. One could envision four of the robots passing boxes to eachother.

  • You will be creating your presentation on the NuVu Platform.

    Things to do/think about:

    • Your presentation should be located in the Portfolio tab of your project.
    • There should be (1) post titled Process with all of the slides.
    • If needed, you can have (1) post of a video of your project in action.
    • All slides should have a title. You can add titles when editing the post
    • With the exception of the Title slide NO TEXT SHOULD APPEAR ON YOUR SLIDES.
    • Only (1) image per slide. NO GOOGLE DOCS!!!
    • Be sure to add your team members as collaborators and make the (2) posts Public.
    • Only one team member can edit a post at a time!
    • Presentations should be no longer than 3 minutes. PRACTICE!

    1st Post : Process

    Absolutely no more than 8 Slides!

    1 Intention Slide. For build projects, describe the Problem and Solution. For conceptual projects this can be expressed as Intention/Solution. The slide should include the name of the project and a one sentence statement of both the problem and the solution.

    Example:
    Segmented Vehicle
    Problem: Design a vehicle for a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse.
    Solution:  A segmented vehicle with a universal joint system handles mountainous terrain by conforming to the landscape.
     
    1  Precedent Slides. One slide to show conceptual idea. One slide to show mechanical or functional idea.
     

    1 Brainstorming Slide. This should be a clean sketch of your initial ideas. If you do not have a nice drawing or lost yours, create one now!

    2 Iteration Slides. These slides should show early prototypes of your design. Focus on big changes. You do not need to show tiny Changes.

    3 Final Slides. These should show clean images of your final project.

    Text:

    In the text section for the process post, write a paragraph introducing the design problem or the main idea and how you are tackling it. Then, describe the main story or theme, mechanics, development, challenges, and other parts of the creative process you experienced. Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

    1. Design Problem and Solution:

    You should begin with a clear statement of the problem and the solution as both a one sentence description and a short paragraph expanding on the solution.

    Here is an example from the Reaction Shelter project:

    • The Problem: Over 300 natural disasters occur globally every year, displacing 32.5 million people on average.Domestically, 99 federal disaster declarations were on file with FEMA in 2011.
    • The Solution: The Reaction Housing System is a rapid response, short-term housing solution.
    • Detailed Solution: The core sustem components flat pack to provide extremeley efficient storage and transportation. The systems can be deployed within hours of an event without the need for tools or heavy machinery.

    2. Further Ellaboration:

    • Main Story or Theme: describe in further detail the reason for your project and the overall way you are solving that problem
    • Mechanics: Describe how your project works and what it is doing
    • Development: Briefly explain the progression of your project
    • Challenges: Describe technical and design challenges you faced or are still facing. 

    3. Iterations

    Each iteration should have a paragraph describing how you how you modified the project after receiving feedback.

    Here is an example from the Backcountry IV Project:

    • In our second iteration, we redesigned the cylinder so that it actually had two compartments that would screw together. Though there were two compartments, there would be a small piece in between the two that would screw them together, so that they remained the same diameter and size. We designed the piece to fit exactly between the two compartments so that it wouldn’t be visible when the entire piece was together. The part had triangular shaped spaces cutting through it where the IV tube and wires for the technology side of our studio fit. In the upper cylinder, the holes remained for the UV lights, but there was more space underneath for the Arduino. In the bottom compartment, we created a hole in the middle designed to fit the IV reservoir and tubing, and small spaces directly next to the reservoir where the resistors to warm the reservoir sat. This spacing for the pieces worked well, except that the entire reservoir piece took up too much room, so much that all of the compartments didn’t screw together. Underneath the inner part designed to hold the reservoir and resistors, there was room underneath to hold the arm cuff and the excess tubing. We also designed two caps to close together the whole piece. Except for the fact that it was a bit sharp and there some minor fitting issues, the caps worked well and made the entire piece compact and portable. For the next iteration, which was the final one, we made a few critical changes.

    2nd Post: Video

    Upoload a short video showing your project in action. Do not count on your project working as you expect during the presentation.

     

     

  • Our world is mountainous with difficult terrain to traverse. The ‘Segmented Mountain Climber’ is able to deftly maneuver up and down the steep mountainsides, and over their sharp peaks. Its Whegs, half wheel half legs, are able to climb over both small rocks and large boulders. It can also quickly reverse, turn and is able to continue movement even if flipped upside down. 

    Our original idea was a mountainous world with difficult terrain to traverse. We started by brainstorming many different models that could help climb mountains. We decided on a segmented car which could work best in a mountainous situation by conforming to the landscape. It’s called ‘Segmented Mountain Climber’.

         During the first few days, we thought of various shapes for the vehicle, drawing inspiration from existing creations including roller coasters, snakes and trains. Then we brainstormed various designs for the wheels, including tank treads, legs, many small wheels, and large powered wheels.

         In order to better visualize the connections and turning of the segments, we made our first prototype of the large-wheeled model. In essence, it was just a trio of cardboard boxes tied together with string, with an axle and pair of wheels through each segment. However, some clear problems came up: the connection was not sturdy enough, and the wheels failed to rotate. We discussed at length how to incorporate the right wheels and connectors into our design. We started looking at other possible wheel choices, and then we settled on wegs. A weg is essentially a spoked wheel with the rim removed. Deriving its name from the words "wheel" and "leg," it could use circular motion, but with legs. Compared to traditional wheels, they could climb over obstructions and had superior grip. We also decided to replace the strings. At first, we had considered ball joints by virtue of their versatility, however we chose to nix the ball joints in favor of universal joints, because they could be better incorporated into the segments. Universal joints are basically two axles intersecting at a point, offering flexibility in two dimensions. Furthermore, the ability to transfer torque is exclusive to universal joints, so they could prevent any one segment from falling over. 

        Taking these considerations into account, we replaced the string and wheels on our prototype with universal joints and wegs. Upon finishing, we realized that the wegs in the prototype had the right structure but would not rotate because of the material (cardboard), the number of legs (4), and the structure of the foot. We decided that a 6-legged wooden weg would work better, and we redesigned the shape of the foot to include rubber that could provide traction. Another problem was the turning, we considered models such as rack-and-pinion, which was too delicate and complicated, and exploiting right-and-left rotation differences, which wouldn't work as well in a multi-car design such as ours. We decided on using a servo to rotate the first compartment relative to the others, turning the rest in due course. We didn't know, however, how we could incorporate the servo into the overall design. We decided that the joints would be included into the design of the car segments, and the servo would be attached to the foremost universal joint via a 3D-printed attachment. Unfortunately, a problem inherent to servos was the elimination of one of the two axes of rotation; as a result, the first and second compartments would always stay firm on uneven ground.

    Finally, after considering all these issues, we crafted the final product, learning from our previous errors. We used wood, which is much sturdier than cardboard; we used wegs, capable of scaling obstacles, and we used a servo to turn and manipulate the vehicle. We connected the motors and servo to an Arduino controlled by a remote. Overall, we had many separate design challenges; in the end, however, all the components came together to form a polished final product.