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  • Three Upper School students from our NuVuX partner school, All Saints Academy in Florida, were selected for their outstanding work in Innovation Studio and awarded the 2019 All Saints Innovation Studio Prize. In recognition of their outstanding work during the 2018 calendar year, the three winners were awarded a three day trip to NuVu in Cambridge, MA. In addition to working on their projects with expert coaches and presenting to the NuVu community, they also toured MIT with NuVu co-founder David Wang, and ate their first authentic Boston Cream Pie.

    Lauren Paffrath dazzled coaches with her achievement in creating the Digital Dessert Designer, a chocolate 3D printing device, in the Spring. While at NuVu Cambridge she worked on her independent studio project, the Interactive Chess Board, which includes a robotic arm and custom designed chess pieces to create a unique playing experience. In the Fall, Elly Evans demonstrated her commitment to easing the animal shelter experience for large dog breeds, specifically German Shepherds, with her Essential Collar, a device designed to reduce anxiety for dogs through light therapy, aromatherapy, and pressure points. She continued her work on this project in Cambridge, exploring ways in which the collar design geometry could continue to integrate with the triad of stress-reduction methods she had fastidiously researched.

    In a collaborative studio with Karam House in Rehyanli, Turkey, in the Fall, Emily Foppe captured the spirit of her studio by designing a responsive lighting object, intending to connect people across continents to create a global community. Her interactive light artifact, the Human Scale, was informed and inspired by her experience as a gymnast, and invited users to place lighted orbs along the spine of an abstracted figure balanced on one leg. Inspired by the pulsing of a heartbeat, she developed this work further in Cambridge by aspiring to program the orbs’ pulsing light to respond dynamically to touch and movement, beating slowly when at rest, or more quickly when in motion.

    Congratulations to Lauren, Emily and Ellyn for their hard work and dedication to furthering their projects.